11-02-18 In Memory of CO Ag Hall of Fame Member Benjamin H. Konishi

In Memory of CO Ag Hall of Fame Member Benjamin H. Konishi

Well known Alamosa resident and veterinarian Dr. Benjamin “Ben” H. Konishi, 92 died October 29, 2018 at the Evergreen Nursing Home in Alamosa.

Viewing will take place at the Rogers Family Mortuary in Alamosa on Friday, November 2, 2018 from 4:00-8:00 p.m. The Graveside Service will be held at 9:00 a.m. Saturday, November 3, 2018 at the Alamosa Cemetery with a Memorial Service at 11:00 a.m. at the Ortega Middle School, 401 Victoria Ave. in Alamosa.

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11-02-18 Trade and Farm Bill Take Front and Center at 2018 NAWG/USW Fall Conference

Trade and Farm Bill Take Front and Center at 2018 NAWG/USW Fall Conference

Washington, D.C. (November 2, 2018) – The National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) and U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) concluded their joint annual Fall Conference this week in Tampa, FL. More than 100 wheat growers from across the United States met in policy committees to discuss a wide variety of priorities including the farm bill, trade, the National Wheat Yield Contest, and the 2018 midterm elections.

“This past week wheat growers from across the United States came together to communicate about the policy issues that are impacting their operations and work with one another to find solutions to common problems,” stated NAWG President and Oklahoma wheat grower Jimmie Musick. “The 2018 Fall Conference couldn’t come at a better time as Congress works to pass the 2018 farm bill during lame duck, and mid-term elections may bring in a wave of Democrat legislators which will significantly alter the congressional agenda.” Continue reading

11-02-18 Interior Disburses $112.5 Million in FY 2018 Energy Revenues to Colorado

Interior Disburses $112.5 Million in FY 2018 Energy Revenues to Colorado

Revenues going back to the state will fund critical educational and infrastructure improvements, land and water conservation projects

WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke announced today that Interior’s Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR), disbursed $112.560 million in Fiscal Year 2018 energy revenues to Colorado. This represents an increase of $20.520 million from the previous year’s total. The funds are derived from energy produced on federal and Indian lands, as well as U.S. offshore areas.

“President Trump’s energy dominance strategy is paying off and local communities across America are the beneficiaries,” said Zinke. “Trump Administration policies like reforming and reducing regulatory burdens and broadening access to the nation’s oil, gas and coal resources, have made America the largest oil and gas producer in the world. For a second year, energy disbursements are up, this year by $1.82 billion, for a total of $8.93 billion that will be shared with states and Tribes. This critical source of funding will be used for educational and infrastructure improvements and land and water conservation projects, and to create good-paying American jobs.”

Energy disbursements for FY 2018 totaled $8.93 billion, an increase of nearly $1.82 billion from the previous year. The increase is primarily attributed to higher oil prices, increased oil production, expedited permitting, streamlined regulations, and increased demand, during the year as the economy and exports have continued to expand. Continue reading

11-02-18 Interior Department Announces Second Consecutive Year of Growth in Energy Revenues as FY 2018 Disbursements Climb to $8.93 Billion

Interior Department Announces Second Consecutive Year of Growth in Energy Revenues as FY 2018 Disbursements Climb to $8.93 Billion

Increase of $1.82 billion is further testament to success of President Trump’s strategy for American energy dominance

WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke announced today that Interior’s Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) disbursed $8.93 billion in Fiscal Year 2018 from energy production on federal and American Indian lands and offshore areas. That figure represents an increase of $1.82 billion over the previous year.

“President Trump’s energy dominance strategy is paying off and local communities across America are the beneficiaries,” said Zinke. “Trump Administration policies like reforming and reducing regulatory burdens and broadening access to the nation’s oil, gas and coal resources, have made America the largest oil and gas producer in the world. For a second year, energy disbursements are up, this year by $1.82 billion, for a total of $8.93 billion that will be shared with states and Tribes. This critical source of funding will be used for educational and infrastructure improvements and land and water conservation projects, and to create good-paying American jobs.”

Often the second-highest generator of federal income following taxes, energy revenue disbursements are a critical source of funding to states, American Indian Tribes and individual Indian mineral owners, as well as to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, Reclamation Fund, Historic Preservation Fund and the U.S. Treasury. ONRR disbursed more than $1.78 billion of the FY 2018 energy revenues to 35 states as their cumulative share of revenues collected from oil, gas and mineral production on federal lands within their borders and from offshore oil and gas tracts in federal waters adjacent to their shores. The top states receiving FY 2018 revenues were:

  • New Mexico $634.9 million
  • Wyoming $563.9 million
  • Colorado $112.5 million
  • Louisiana $91 million
  • Utah $76 million

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11-02-18 SRM Announces 72nd Annual Meeting Program in Minneapolis, MN Feb 10-14

Society for Range Management Announces 72nd Annual Meeting Program in Minneapolis, MN Feb 10-14

November 2, 2018 (SRM) – The Society for Range Management will host its 72nd Annual Meeting, Sunday, February 10 through Thursday, February 14, 2019 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Each year, the Society’s annual conference brings together the leaders in range management and natural resources. Attendance at each conference includes members from academia, agency professionals, land stewards, producers, and students representing universities and high schools from across the country.

This year’s conference’s theme, “Gateway to the Prairie” will serve to showcase the myriad of agricultural sectors and land management services specific to Minnesota and the surrounding prairie region. The meeting will kick off with an exciting plenary session, highlighted by Clay Jenkinson, the principal consultant of the Theodore Roosevelt Center at Dickinson State University and for the Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library Foundation, and an award winning historical performer and voice of Thomas Jefferson on the weekly radio program “The Jefferson Hour”. Other presenters include Stanley Temple, the Beers-Bascom Professor Emeritus in Conservation in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Dr. Craig Allen, leader of the U.S. Geological Survey-Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit. Additional information on the plenary and invited speakers can be found on our website: http://annualmeeting.rangelands.org/plenary/. Continue reading

READ the NAFB’s National Ag News for Friday, November 2nd

CLICK HERE to listen to TODAY's BARN Morning Ag News with Brian Allmer...

CLICK HERE to listen to TODAY’s BARN Morning Ag News with Brian Allmer…

Sponsored by the American Farm Bureau Federation

READ the NAFB’s National Ag News for Friday, November 2nd

EPA Extends Dicamba Registration; Additional Restrictions

The Environmental Protection Agency made its long-awaited decision on extending dicamba use. The agency extended the over-the-top application of dicamba through the 2020 growing season while adding some additional usage restrictions. Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler said in a press release that the agency understands just how valuable a tool dicamba is for farmers to battle pest problems. “By extending the label for two more years with additional label restrictions to the product, we’re providing certainty for all stakeholders ahead of the upcoming growing season,” he says. Among some of the changes to the label, only certified applicators may make over-the-top applications. Those working under the supervision of a certified applicator may no longer make over-the-top applications. The new label prohibits over-the-top application on soybeans 45 days after planting, with no cotton applications allowed 60 days after planting. The label drops the limit of over-the-top applications on cotton from four to two, while the number of allowable over-the-top applications on soybeans will stay at two. The label will also deal with other topics like enhanced tank clean-out instructions, as well as buffer requirements.

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Farm Support for Trump Still Strong Despite Trade Difficulties

A new poll out shows that farmers and ranchers still overwhelmingly support President Donald Trump. However, the poll also shows that they would like the White House to focus more on building exports and ending the trade war with China. The poll was commissioned by Agri-Pulse. Editor Sara Wyant says the president mentions his support for farmers and his work on improving trade at every rural political rally he attends. “That’s even as economic conditions on the farm are very difficult,” says Wyant. “Our research shows that farmers and ranchers are willing to give him the benefit of the doubt, plus, they appear optimistic about his trade and regulatory policies. Producers still seem to believe there will be a payoff in the long run.” The poll shows that 79 percent of farmers reached by phone strongly approve or approve President Trump. On the other end, 19 percent of respondents disapprove of the president. Along party lines, 92 percent of Republican producers approve of the way Trump is doing his job, 33 percent of Democrats, and 65 percent of independent voters also approve of the president. About 67 percent of Democratic farmers, which made up 12 percent of the total poll respondents, disapprove of Trump’s job performance.  

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Gag Order Struck Down in NC Nuisance Lawsuits

An appeals court struck down the gag order put into effect by the trial judge in the North Carolina hog nuisance lawsuits because it violated the First Amendment. The industry website Meating Place Dot Com says the court granted defendant Murphy-Brown’s request to strike down the gag order. The three-judge panel said in its ruling that the gag order “had an unacceptable and chilling effect” on free speech. The gag order had prevented Murphy-Brown, the hog production unit for Smithfield Foods, from responding to attacks on the way it does business, as well as its public policy involvement. The appeals court ruling says the gag order had already inflicted serious harm on parties, advocates, and potential witnesses alike. “It muted political engagement on a public issue of great public and private consequence,” the written ruling says. “It’s hamstrung the exercise of First Amendment rights. Even in short doses, these practices are always harmful to the First Amendment.” The appeals court ruling comes as Murphy-Brown and attorneys for 500 plaintiffs are in mediation. Both sides have asked the trial judge to certify the first three cases so Smithfield can take it to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.

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Groups Endorse Agribusiness Merger Moratorium Bills

A broad coalition of more than 200 farm, food, rural, faith, and consumer advocacy groups delivered a letter to Congress endorsing food and agribusiness merger moratorium bills. They’re also urging members of the House and Senate to co-sponsor the legislation, introduced as the Food and Agribusiness Merger Moratorium and Antitrust Review Act of 2018. The National Farmers Union is one of those groups that signed on to the letter. NFU President Roger Johnson says corporate consolidation has long been one of the greatest challenges plaguing family farmers, ranchers, and rural coommunities. “By allowing us to step back to evaluate and strengthen the United States’ antitrust framework, the merger moratorium is a meaningful first step in stemming the tide of concentration in the agriculture and food sectors.” The legislation would impose an 18-month moratorium on the mega-mergers that have swept through agribusiness, food manufacturing, and the grocery industries. The letter to Congress says the consolidation has contributed to falling farm prices, declining farm incomes, stagnant wages for food workers, raising food prices and economic stagnation in rural communities. The letter points out that “a few colossal companies are reaping profits from their control of every link in the food chain.”

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American Pig Farmers Embrace One Health Day Principles

America’s pig farmers will take part in the celebration of the global One Health Day on Saturday, November third. Producers will reaffirm their commitment to using antimicrobials responsibly as they do their part to reduce antibiotic resistance. This supports producers’ core values of continuous improvement and doing what’s right for the health of people, pigs, and the planet. National Pork Board President Steve Rommereim says pig farmers work every day to ensure their animal’s health and welfare while embracing environmental stewardship to mutually benefit all. “One Health Day is a good opportunity to share with the public that we are committed to using antibiotics responsibly and to doing our part to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance,” says Rommereim. Doctor Heather Fowler of the National Pork Board says, “There’s no single factor driving antimicrobial resistance. It’s a complex issue with human, animal, and environmental health all contributing to the outcome.” She says that’s why a transdisciplinary approach like One Health is essential to ensure optimal health well into the future.

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Environmental Groups Petition EPA over RFS Land-Use Regulations

A coalition of environmental groups petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency about changing how the agency accounts for land-use changes under the Renewable Fuels Standard. The petition asks the EPA to amend its regulations regarding what land can be used to produce biomass under the Energy Independence and Security Act’s RFS. Agriculture groups are challenging the petition, saying that statistics from the USDA, the EPA itself, and other agencies prove that land use in crop production is shrinking. Lynn Chrisp (Crisp), National Corn Growers Association President, says overall land use in growing principal crops is shrinking nationwide. “The reality of what’s happening on today’s farms is not accurately portrayed in the petition.” Farmers planted fewer acres to corn in 2018 (89.1) million than they did when the RFS was expanded in 2007 (93.5 million). Overall, the area planted to principal crops in the U.S. has dropped from 328.6 million acres in 2000 to 322 million acres this year, according to data from the USDA.

SOURCE: NAFB News Service

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