09-11-18 CDA State Veterinarian Dr Keith Roehr, DVM Provides an Update on the Current EIA Investigation in CO…

CDA State Veterinarian Dr Keith Roehr, DVM Provides an Update on the Current EIA Investigation in CO…

BRIGGSDALE, CO – September 11, 2018 – In late August, the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s State Veterinarian’s Office started an investigation into a Weld County horse that tested positive for Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) in late August.  Joining the CO Ag News Network and FarmCast Radio to discuss where the investigation stands this far is Dr. Keith Roehr, State Veterinarian with the CO Department of Agriculture

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ORIGINAL PRESS RELEASE FROM AUG 28, 2018

Additional Resources Regarding EIA:

FAQs about Equine Infectious Anemia

What is Equine Infectious Anemia?

Equine Infectious Anemia is a viral disease spread by bloodsucking insects, inappropriate use of needles, or other equipment used between susceptible equine animals such as horses, mules and donkeys. Horses may not appear to have any symptoms of the disease, although it also can cause high fever, weakness, weight loss, an enlarged spleen, anemia, weak pulse and even death.

How is it spread?

It is spread most commonly through blood by biting flies such as horse flies and deer flies.

What happens to an infected horse?

There is no cure for the disease, so animals which test positive or are infected have to be quarantined for life or euthanized.

Is there a danger to people?

No. The disease can only be spread to horses, mules and donkeys.

Is the disease common?

No. There has only been a small number of cases in the United States, although the disease exists in other parts of the world. A map of cases from the year 2017 is available at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-disease-information/horse-disease-information/equine-infectious-anemia/ct_eia_distribution_maps.

How is the disease controlled?

Equine Infectious Anemia is a disease for which horses must be tested annually before they can be transported across state lines. The test for EIA is commonly called a Coggins Test.

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