10-12-16 A Closer Look at CO’s Ballot Initiatives & Amendments w/Independence Institute’s Amy Oliver Cooke…

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amy_oliver_cooke(The BARN – Briggsdale, CO) October 12, 2016 – Joining me inside the BARN on the Colorado Ag News Network is Amy Oliver Cooke is the Executive Vice President and Director of the Energy Policy Center for the Independence Institute, and we’ll be discussing the upcoming elections and in particular the statewide ballot initiatives and amendments. There are 9 statewide ballot measures are certified to appear on the Colorado ballot on November 8th…

  • Amendment T*
  • Amendment U*
  • Amendment 69*
  • Amendment 70 *
  • Amendment 71**
  • Amendment 72**
  • Proposition 106**
  • Proposition 107**
  • Proposition 108**
  • & More**

*Amy Oliver Cooke Interview – Part 1

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**Amy Oliver Cooke Interview – Part 2

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The mission of the Independence Institute is to empower individuals and to educate citizens, legislators and opinion makers about public policies that enhance personal and economic freedom. Learn more online @ https://www.i2i.org/

 

10-12-16 USDA-NASS: Colorado Crop Production for October 2016…

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CROP PRODUCTION – OCTOBER 2016

COLORADO HIGHLIGHTS

Based on October 1 conditions, corn production in Colorado is forecast at 164.2 million bushels, up 22 percent from last year’s 134.90 million bushels, according to the October 1 Agricultural Yield Survey conducted by the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. The 1.20 million acres expected to be harvested for grain this year are up 90,000 acres from the September forecast and 240,000 acres above the 950,000 acres harvested a year ago. Corn yield is estimated at 138.0 bushels per acre, down 2.0 bushels from the September 1 forecast and 4.0 bushels below last year’s final yield. As of October 2, Colorado’s corn crop condition was rated 1 percent very poor, 3 percent poor, 22 percent fair, 58 percent good, and 16 percent excellent. Corn harvested for grain was 9 percent complete, compared with 10 percent last year and the 5-year average of 13 percent.

Sorghum production in 2016 is forecast at 20.67 million bushels, down 6 percent from the 22.00 million bushels harvested last year. Growers expect to harvest 390,000 acres this year, up 50,000 acres from the September forecast but down from the 400,000 acres harvested last year. Average yield is forecast at 53.0 bushels per acre, up 7.0 bushels from the September 1 forecast but down 2.0 bushels from last year. As of October 2, Colorado’s sorghum crop condition was rated 5 percent poor, 30 percent fair, 58 percent good, and 7 percent excellent. Sorghum harvested for grain was estimated at 6 percent complete, compared with 10 percent last year and the 5-year average of 7 percent.

The initial forecast of all sunflower production is estimated at 95.20 million pounds, up 12 percent from the 2015 crop of 85.20 million pounds. All sunflower yield is expected to average 1,400 pounds per acre, an increase of 165 pounds from last year. Harvested area is estimated at 68,000 acres, down from the 69,000 acres harvested last year. As of October 2, Colorado’s sunflower crop condition was rated 3 percent poor, 26 percent fair, 63 percent good, and 8 percent excellent.

Alfalfa hay production in Colorado is forecast at 2.85 million tons, down from the 2.87 million tons produced in 2015. Colorado farmers and ranchers expect to harvest 750,000 acres of alfalfa hay this year, up 50,000 acres from 2015. Alfalfa hay yield is expected to average 3.80 tons per acre, compared with last year’s yield of 4.10 tons per acre and the August 1 forecast of 3.80 tons per acre. Producers expect to harvest 750,000 acres of other hay in 2016, unchanged from last year. Other hay production is estimated at 1.50 million tons, up 5 percent from the 1.43 million tons a year ago. Other hay yield is expected to average 2.00 tons per acre, compared with last year’s yield of 1.90 tons per acre and the August 1 forecast of 1.90 tons per acre.

Sugarbeet production in Colorado is forecast at 954,000 tons, down slightly from the 958,000 tons produced in 2015. Growers expect to harvest 27,500 acres this year, compared with 27,300 a year ago. Yields are expected to average 34.7 tons per acre, up 0.1 tons per acre from the September 1 forecast but down from last year’s yield of 35.1 tons per acre. As of October 2, Colorado’s sugarbeet crop condition was rated 1 percent poor, 15 percent fair, 70 percent good, and 14 percent excellent. Harvest of sugarbeets was estimated at 8 percent complete, compared with 34 percent last year and the 5-year average of 22 percent.

Dry bean production for 2016 is forecast at 774,000 hundredweight, down 9 percent from the 846,000 hundredweight produced a year earlier. Yields are expected to average 1,800 pounds per acre, down 200 pounds per acre from the August 1 forecast and down from 1,820 pounds per acre last year. Growers expect to harvest 43,000 acres this year, down 3,500 acres from the 46,500 acres harvested last year. As of October 2, Colorado’s dry bean crop condition was rated 2 percent poor, 31 percent fair, 59 percent good, and 8 percent excellent. Dry bean harvest was estimated to be 56 percent complete, compared to 42 percent last year and the 5-year average of 55 percent.

UNITED STATES HIGHLIGHTS
Continue reading

10-12-16 USDA releases October 2016 WASDE Update..

WAOB- World Ag Outlook Board - WASDE

The current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) is now available in PDF, XML, and Microsoft Excel formats at:

http://www.usda.gov/oce/commodity/wasde

Acrobat Reader, which is required to view and print the WASDE report, can be downloaded at:

http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

The next release of the WASDE report will be November 9, 2016.

Previous WASDE reports are available at http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do?documentID=1194.

NAFB: USDA WASDE Report at a Glance

Corn: Corn production is forecast at 15.057 billion bushels, down 36 million from last month as a lower forecast yield more than offsets an increase in harvested area. Corn supplies for 2016/17 are down slightly to 16.845 billion bushels, as a lower crop more than offsets a small increase in beginning stocks based on the September 30 Grain Stocks report Continue reading

10-12-16 Red Angus News: Red Angus Association of America selects leaders for coming year

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The Red Angus Association of America has selected the following Red Angus cattle breeders to serve as the 2016-17 Board of Directors. Pictured from left to right are Stuart Gilbert, Stockport, Iowa; Steve Koester, Steele, North Dakota; Kevin Miller, Briggsdale, Colorado; Bruce Ketchum, Plevna, Montana; Johnny Rogers, Roxboro, North Carolina; Newley Hutchison, Canton, Oklahoma; Bob Morton, Three Forks, Montana; Chuck Feddes, Manhattan, Montana; Raymond Prescott, Gray Court, South Carolina; Kyley DeVoe, Justin, Texas; Connie Mushrush, Strong City, Kansas; John Langdon, Benson, North Carolina; Tom Brink, RAAA CEO; and Sam Lorenzen, Bend, Oregon.

The Red Angus Association of America has selected the following Red Angus cattle breeders to serve as the 2016-17 Board of Directors. Pictured from left to right are Stuart Gilbert, Stockport, Iowa; Steve Koester, Steele, North Dakota; Kevin Miller, Briggsdale, Colorado; Bruce Ketchum, Plevna, Montana; Johnny Rogers, Roxboro, North Carolina; Newley Hutchison, Canton, Oklahoma; Bob Morton, Three Forks, Montana; Chuck Feddes, Manhattan, Montana; Raymond Prescott, Gray Court, South Carolina; Kyley DeVoe, Justin, Texas; Connie Mushrush, Strong City, Kansas; John Langdon, Benson, North Carolina; Tom Brink, RAAA CEO; and Sam Lorenzen, Bend, Oregon.

The 2016-17 Junior Red Angus Association of America Board of Directors include (from left to right) Kacey Koester, Steele, North Dakota; Genna VanWye, Atlanta, Illinois; Joseph Groce, Lexington, North Carolina; Savannah Howard, Shelby, North Carolina and Royce McPhee-Bayha, Lodi, California.

The 2016-17 Junior Red Angus Association of America Board of Directors include (from left to right) Kacey Koester, Steele, North Dakota; Genna VanWye, Atlanta, Illinois; Joseph Groce, Lexington, North Carolina; Savannah Howard, Shelby, North Carolina and Royce McPhee-Bayha, Lodi, California.

Red Angus Association of America selects leaders for coming year

Denton, Texas – A full two days of presentations, discussions and elections filled the agenda for the Red Angus Association of America’s National Red Angus Convention held in Oklahoma City. Continue reading

10-12-16 Red Angus News: Honors presented during the Red Angus Association of America Awards Banquet

Red Angus Media logoHonors presented during the Red Angus Association of America Awards Banquet

Denton, Texas – Honoring individuals for the loyalty, service, and commitment to excellence in the Red Angus breed has long been the tradition of the annual awards banquet held on the final evening of the National Red Angus Convention. The 2016 installment of the event, “Where the Red Angus Roam,” held in Oklahoma City at the downtown Cox Convention Center was no exception. Following a tremendous dinner featuring Meyer Natural Angus steaks, the awards program recognized some of the top ranches, businesses and industry supporters who do an exceptional job of promoting the Red Angus breed. Continue reading

10-12-16 KSU: Researchers earn patent for soybean variety that may save industry millions of dollars a year…

Timothy C. Todd, left, instructor of plant pathology, and Harold N. Trick, professor of plant pathology, in the greenhouse where they research soybeans and nematode parasitic infection.

Timothy C. Todd, left, instructor of plant pathology, and Harold N. Trick, professor of plant pathology, in the greenhouse where they research soybeans and nematode parasitic infection.

Researchers earn patent for soybean variety that may save industry millions of dollars a year

KSU Kansas State University logo 2016MANHATTAN — If parasites want to get to soybeans, they’ll have to go through Kansas State University researchers first.

Harold N. Trick, professor of plant pathology; Timothy C. Todd, instructor of plant pathology; and Jiarui Li, research assistant professor in plant pathology, have designed and patented a soybean variety that protects from nematode parasitic infestation.

Soybeans are the second largest crop in the U.S. and bring in about $37 billion each year. But nematode parasites — the No. 1 soybean disease in the nation — plague the crop with stunting, chlorosis, wilting and higher susceptibility to other diseases. The new variety from Kansas State University could potentially save the soybean industry millions of dollars per year.

“Basically, we’ve designed a soybean variety that fights back against parasites,” Trick said. “It affects nematodes by stopping their reproduction cycles.” Continue reading

10-12-16 SYNGENTA: FFA attracts more young women to ag careers, strengthening the ag industry

syngentalogo_2pmsFFA attracts more young women to ag careers, strengthening the ag industry

  • Female membership in FFA continues to grow nationwide
  • This organization helps women develop leadership skills
  • National FFA Convention will be held Oct. 19-21 in Indianapolis
Click here to learn more about the National FFA Organization

Click here to learn more about the National FFA Organization

GREENSBORO, N.C., USA, October 11, 2016 When the 2016 National FFA Convention convenes on October 19 in Indianapolis, representatives from Syngenta predict they could see record numbers of female attendees. That’s because female membership in FFA grew from 26 percent during the 1992-93 academic year to 44 percent during the 2015-16 academic year. Plus, females have risen to top leadership roles; this year, young women hold five of the six national FFA offices.

“Organizations like FFA and 4-H help foster leadership skills for all participants,” said Jenny Heaton, head of talent management for Syngenta, North America. “As more leadership opportunities open up for young women, these experiences should provide them with more confidence that the agricultural world is ready to accept them as equal partners.”   Continue reading

READ the NAFB’s National Ag News for Wednesday, October 12th…

CLICK HERE to listen to TODAY's BARN Morning Ag News with Brian Allmer...

CLICK HERE to listen to TODAY’s BARN Morning Ag News with Brian Allmer…

Sponsored by the American Farm Bureau Federation

USDA to Purchase Surplus Cheese

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Tuesday the U.S. Department of Agriculture is offering to purchase $20 million of cheddar cheese to reduce a private cheese surplus that has reached record levels. The announcement followed a roundtable discussion with dairy producers in Wisconsin. USDA will use the surplus cheese to assist food banks and other food assistance recipients. USDA predicts dairy prices will increase throughout the rest of this year, but low world market prices, increased milk supplies and inventories and slower demand have contributed to a sluggish market. The slow market has caused dairy revenues to drop 35 percent over the past two years. Vilsack says a solicitation will be issued shortly, and cheese deliveries to food banks and other food assistance recipients are expected to start in March of 2017.

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Syngenta Confirms Takeover Funding OK

Syngenta says bridge financing for the ChemChina takeover of Syngenta is “committed and irrevocable.” The comments come after a news agency in China reported over the weekend that a $15 billion piece of the deal’s funding remains missing, citing several people it said were close to the deal, according to Reuters. A Syngenta spokesperson said this week “We have no comment to make on this article, and ChemChina is proceeding with their refinancing strategy.” State-owned ChemChina is borrowing heavily to buy Syngenta. The proposed $43 billion takeover is the biggest overseas offer ever made by a Chinese company and was expected to be completed by the end of this year.

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Support for Government Intervention in Nutrition Doubles

A recent survey shows support for government interventions that limit, restrict or warn consumers about the risks of junk food has nearly doubled since 2012. Politico reports the FoodMinds survey found 70 percent of respondents felt the government should help consumers understand how junk food fits into a healthy diet. 30 percent of respondents felt the government should restrict or limit the availability of junk food. The survey polled 684 “opinion-leader shoppers” — a so-called subgroup of “politically aware,” “socially active” registered voters who are the primary grocery shoppers for their households. The poll also found 58 percent of Republican respondents support excluding soft drinks and empty-calorie foods from SNAP. For Democrats, 34 percent were in favor, 13 percent strongly opposed.

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USDA Trims Wheat Import Forecast for Egypt

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has trimmed its import forecast for Egypt. Pro Farmer’s First Thing Today reports the reduction is due to credit issues. A USDA office in Egypt cut its wheat import forecast for both 2015-16 and 2016-17 to 11.6 million metric tons and 11.8 million metric tons, respectively. USDA says the reductions are “due to a persistent shortage of foreign currency that has made opening letters of credit more difficult, significantly hampering imports.” But USDA also noted that rising feed demand should boost the nation’s corn imports in 2016-17 by around three percent from the previous season to 8.6 million metric tons. That is just below USDA’s official 8.75 million metric ton import outlook.

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Missouri Right to Farm does not Apply to Marijuana

A Missouri judge ruled a St Louis man had no legal right under Missouri’s Right to Farm amendment to grow marijuana plants. The St Louis Post-Dispatch reports the judge sentenced Mark Shanklin to 120 days of jail time and five years’ probation after being found guilty of drug charges. The man didn’t dispute he was growing more than 300 marijuana plants in his home, but argued the Right to Farm amendment guarantees the right to cultivate marijuana. Missouri’s Right to Farm amendment was passed by voters in 2014 and states farming practices “shall be forever guaranteed in this state.” Shanklin argued that state laws prohibiting marijuana cultivation are at odds with the amendment. But the judge ruled that Marijuana is not a common item harvested, and that “even when constitutional amendments are designed to address government overreach…they are seldom intended to give citizens free rein to harm themselves or others.” A similar defense failed for a Jefferson City, Missouri woman in 2015 after being caught with nine marijuana plants in her basement.

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No Reason to ‘Bee’ Worried

Despite the recent endangered listing of a Hawaii-specific bee species, the Washington Post says bees are doing just fine. In a report this week, a Washington Post blog says the endangered species only accounts for a handful of relatively obscure species that live in Hawaii. Wild bees are plentiful, according to data from the Department of Agriculture. Further, USDA data shows that in 2015, there were 2.66 million commercial honey-producing bee colonies in the United States. That is down slightly from the 2.74 million colonies in 2014, which represented a two-decade high. The number of commercial bee colonies is still significantly higher than it was in 2006 when colony collapse disorder was first documented. Some research has linked neonicotinoid insecticides to wild bee population declines, but wild bee populations are hard to survey, making an assessment of that claim difficult. The Washington Post blog adds the listing of the Hawaii species is likely an indicator that the other 3,993 bee species are doing fine.

SOURCE: NAFB News Service

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