07-13-16 NGWA: Corrosive groundwater suggests action by certain well owners to check potential lead threat…

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Corrosive groundwater suggests action by certain well owners to check potential lead threat

(WESTERVILLE, OH — July 13, 2016) Since lead is harmful when consumed by both humans and animals, the National Ground Water Association urges residential water well users in regions where corrosive water levels have been detected to investigate and determine whether lead is present in their drinking water.

NGWA issued this important call to action to supplement the release of research results released by the U.S. Geological Survey on July 13, 2016.

While corrosive water does not represent a direct health risk to humans and animals in and of itself, the presence of lead-leaching components in a well system or household plumbing is a concern, especially in older houses and well systems.

Two factors affect how much lead may be leaching into your drinking water:

  • The length of time water is in contact with lead before being used
  • The corrosiveness of the water (due to either high pH or low pH).

Based on these two measures, parts of the United States may have residential water well systems yielding potentially corrosive groundwater, according to the USGS. Its research suggests if private well users are not aware their source water is corrosive, are not treating for it, and have lead-content pipes, plumbing fittings, or well system components, they may be at risk for having lead in their drinking water.

NGWA has been working proactively on this subject.

  • A campaign to encourage well owners to get their water well systems and household plumbing inspected has been launched on WellOwner.org, NGWA’s online resource for private well owners, and will also be a focal component of the Association’s social media messaging.
  • Thanks to a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant, NGWA will be releasing an online education session to further explain its concern and encourage water well system and household plumbing inspections as part of its public awareness effort.
  • A lead-related best suggested practice for water well system professionals was released by NGWA.
  • The Association has also prepared an information brief on the topic for residential well owners, the media, and other interested parties.
  • NGWA members can expect additional coverage in the Association’s member newsletter, NGWA Toolkit, that will be released July 18, 2016.

The Association urges residential water well users in regions where corrosive water levels have been detected to call upon a water well system professional to audit your water system for any components that may have lead content.

NGWA, the leading worldwide advocate for professionals teaming to provide, protect, manage, and remediate groundwater, conveniently and promptly delivers an extensive range of resources contributing to member success through relationships, leading edge and emerging practices, and credible new ideas and solutions.