07-11-14 *USDA/NASS* Colorado Crop Production Report: July 2014

NASS-CO News Release Header - LAKEWOODCROP PRODUCTION – JULY 2014 

COLORADO HIGHLIGHTS

Based on July 1 conditions, winter wheat production in Colorado is forecast at 86.4 million bushels, down 3 percent from the June 1 forecast but 95 percent above the 44.3 million bushels produced last year. Estimated acreage for harvest, at 2.40 million acres, is down 150,000 acres from June 1, but 760,000 acres more than the 1.64 million acres harvested in 2013. As of July 1, the average yield is forecast at 36.0 bushels per acre, 1.0 bushel above the June 1 forecast, and 9.0 bushels above last year’s final yield.

As of June 29, Colorado’s winter wheat crop condition was rated 27 percent very poor, 13 percent poor, 22 percent fair, 31 percent good, and 7 percent excellent. Winter wheat harvested was at 5 percent, compared with 6 percent last year and the 5-year average of 22 percent.

Barley production is forecast at 7.50 million bushels, down 3 percent from the 2013 crop. Area harvested is expected to total 60,000 acres, up 2,000 acres from the 58,000 acres harvested last year. Barley yield is forecast at 125.0 bushels per acre, 8.0 bushels per acre below last year.

As of June 29, Colorado’s barley crop condition was rated 2 percent very poor, 2 percent poor, 13 percent fair, 56 percent good, and 27 percent excellent. Barley headed was at 37 percent, compared with 58 percent last year and the 5-year average of 57 percent.

UNITED STATES HIGHLIGHTS

Winter wheat production is forecast at 1.37 billion bushels, down 1 percent from the June 1 forecast and down 11 percent from 2013. Based on July 1 conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 42.2 bushels per acre, down 0.2 bushel from last month and down 5.2 bushels from last year. The area expected to be harvested for grain or seed totals 32.4 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30, 2014 but up slightly from last year. Hard Red Winter production, at 703 million bushels, is down 2 percent from last month. Soft Red Winter, at 458 million bushels, is up 1 percent from the June forecast. White Winter, at 206 million bushels, is up slightly from last month. Of the White Winter production, 10.6 million bushels are Hard White and 196 million bushels are Soft White.

Production for the 2014 barley crop is forecast at 187 million bushels, down 13 percent from 2013. Based on conditions as of July 1, the average yield for the United States is forecast at 71.2 bushels per acre, down 0.5 bushel from last year. Area harvested for grain or seed, at 2.63 million acres, is unchanged from the previous forecast but down 12 percent from 2013. When compared with last year, yields are expected to decrease throughout much of the United States due to drought conditions in the Pacific Northwest and wet conditions in the Midwest and Northeast. Conversely, adequate moisture in the northern and central Rocky Mountains have lead to  expected yield increases in Montana, Utah, and Wyoming.

For a full copy of the Crop Production report please visit www.nass.usda.gov or CLICK HERE or view the entire report below:

Crop Production

ISSN: 1936-3737

Released July 11, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service
(NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA).

Winter Wheat Production Down 1 Percent from June
Orange Production Down Slightly from June

Winter wheat production is forecast at 1.37 billion bushels, down 1 percent
from the June 1 forecast and down 11 percent from 2013. Based on July 1
conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 42.2 bushels per acre,
down 0.2 bushel from last month and down 5.2 bushels from last year. The area
expected to be harvested for grain or seed totals 32.4 million acres,
unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30, 2014 but up slightly
from last year.

Hard Red Winter production, at 703 million bushels, is down 2 percent from
last month. Soft Red Winter, at 458 million bushels, is up 1 percent from the
June forecast. White Winter, at 206 million bushels, is up slightly from last
month. Of the White Winter production, 10.6 million bushels are Hard White
and 196 million bushels are Soft White.

Durum wheat production is forecast at 59.6 million bushels, down 4 percent
from 2013. The United States yield is forecast at 42.1 bushels per acre, down
1.5 bushels from last year. Expected area to be harvested for grain totals
1.42 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on
June 30, 2014 but down slightly from last year.

Other spring wheat production is forecast at 565 million bushels, up
6 percent from last year. Area harvested for grain is expected to total
12.4 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30,
2014 but up 9 percent from last year. The United States yield is forecast at
45.5 bushels per acre, down 1.6 bushels from 2013. Of the total production,
520 million bushels are Hard Red Spring wheat, up 6 percent from last year.

The United States all orange forecast for the 2013-2014 season is
6.94 million tons, down slightly from the previous forecast and down
16 percent from the 2012-2013 final utilization. The Florida all orange
forecast, at 104 million boxes (4.70 million tons), is up slightly from the
previous forecast but down 22 percent from last season’s final utilization.
Early, midseason, and Navel varieties in Florida are forecast at 53.3 million
boxes (2.40 million tons), unchanged from the previous forecast but down
21 percent from last season. The Florida Valencia orange forecast, at
51.1 million boxes (2.30 million tons), is up slightly from the previous
forecast but down 23 percent from last season’s final utilization.

Florida frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) yield forecast for the
2013-2014 season is 1.57 gallons per box at 42.0 degrees Brix, unchanged from
the June forecast but down 1 percent from last season’s final yield of
1.59 gallons per box. The early-midseason portion is projected at
1.52 gallons per box, up 1 percent from last season’s yield of 1.51 gallons
per box. The Valencia portion is projected at 1.64 gallons per box, down
3 percent from last year’s final yield. All projections of yield assume the
processing relationships this season will be similar to those of the past
several seasons.

This report was approved on July 11, 2014.

Secretary of Agriculture
Designate
Michael T. Scuse

Agricultural Statistics Board
Chairperson
James M. Harris

Contents

Oat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and Forecasted July 1, 2014……  6

Barley Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and Forecasted July 1, 2014…  6

Winter Wheat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and Forecasted
July 1, 2014……………………………………………………………………………………  7

Durum Wheat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and Forecasted
July 1, 2014……………………………………………………………………………………  8

Other Spring Wheat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and Forecasted
July 1, 2014……………………………………………………………………………………  8

Wheat Production by Class – United States: 2013 and Forecasted July 1, 2014……………………………  8

Utilized Production of Citrus Fruits by Crop – States and United States: 2012-2013 and Forecasted
July 1, 2014……………………………………………………………………………………  9

Tobacco Area Harvested, Yield, and Production by Class – States and United States: 2013 and Forecasted
July 1, 2014…………………………………………………………………………………… 10

Miscellaneous Fruits and Nuts Production by Crop – States and United States: 2013 and Forecasted
July 1, 2014…………………………………………………………………………………… 10

Fall Potato Percent of Acreage Planted by Type of Potato – Selected States and Total: 2013 and 2014……… 11

Fall Potato Area Planted for Certified Seed – Selected States and Total: 2013 and 2014…………………. 11

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units – United States: 2013 and 2014….. 12

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units – United States: 2013 and 2014……. 14

Fruits and Nuts Production in Domestic Units – United States: 2013 and 2014…………………………… 16

Fruits and Nuts Production in Metric Units – United States: 2013 and 2014…………………………….. 17

Winter Wheat Objective Yield Percent of Samples Processed in the Lab – United States: 2010-2014…………. 18

Winter Wheat Heads per Square Foot – Selected States: 2010-2014……………………………………… 19

Percent of Normal Precipitation Map………………………………………………………………. 20

Departure from Normal Temperature Map…………………………………………………………….. 20

June Weather Summary……………………………………………………………………………. 21

June Agricultural Summary……………………………………………………………………….. 21

Crop Comments………………………………………………………………………………….. 23

Statistical Methodology…………………………………………………………………………. 26

Information Contacts……………………………………………………………………………. 28

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Oat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and
Forecasted July 1, 2014
——————————————————————————————
:    Area harvested    :    Yield per acre    :      Production
State      :———————————————————————–
:  2013    :  2014    :  2013    :  2014    :  2013    :  2014
——————————————————————————————
:  — 1,000 acres —      —- bushels —-        1,000 bushels
:
California …….:      20          15        80.0        75.0      1,600      1,125
Idaho …………:      15          20        73.0        75.0      1,095      1,500
Illinois ………:      25          23        69.0        75.0      1,725      1,725
Iowa ………….:      60          65        66.0        67.0      3,960      4,355
Kansas ………..:      20          30        42.0        59.0        840      1,770
Michigan ………:      35          45        62.0        63.0      2,170      2,835
Minnesota ……..:    105        140        57.0        57.0      5,985      7,980
Montana ……….:      22          16        54.0        52.0      1,188        832
Nebraska ………:      25          45        65.0        70.0      1,625      3,150
New York ………:      46          40        67.0        75.0      3,082      3,000
:
North Dakota …..:    135        130        62.0        72.0      8,370      9,360
Ohio ………….:      25          40        63.0        61.0      1,575      2,440
Oregon ………..:      13          20      100.0      103.0      1,300      2,060
Pennsylvania …..:      50          60        62.0        55.0      3,100      3,300
South Dakota …..:    120        110        77.0        80.0      9,240      8,800
Texas …………:      50          55        46.0        49.0      2,300      2,695
Wisconsin ……..:    105        140        65.0        63.0      6,825      8,820
:
Other States 1/ ..:    159        159        62.3        61.4      9,899      9,760
:
United States ….:  1,030      1,153        64.0        65.5      65,879      75,507
——————————————————————————————
1/ Other States include Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Maine, Missouri,
North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming.
Individual State level estimates will be published in the “Small Grains 2014 Summary.”

Barley Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and
Forecasted July 1, 2014
———————————————————————————-
:  Area harvested    :  Yield per acre    :    Production
:—————————————————————–
State    :  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :  2014
———————————————————————————-
:    1,000 acres        —- bushels —        1,000 bushels
:
Arizona ……..:    69        43      118.0      115.0      8,142      4,945
California …..:    40        20      75.0      56.0      3,000      1,120
Colorado …….:    58        60      133.0      125.0      7,714      7,500
Idaho ……….:    600        550      93.0      90.0      55,800    49,500
Maryland …….:    52        45      85.0      72.0      4,420      3,240
Minnesota ……:    75        60      69.0      52.0      5,175      3,120
Montana ……..:    830        810      54.0      60.0      44,820    48,600
North Dakota …:    720        600      64.0      62.0      46,080    37,200
Oregon ………:    50        45      70.0      69.0      3,500      3,105
Pennsylvania …:    60        55      68.0      68.0      4,080      3,740
:
Utah ………..:    30        22      79.0      86.0      2,370      1,892
Virginia …….:    41        33      82.0      76.0      3,362      2,508
Washington …..:    185        100      72.0      66.0      13,320      6,600
Wyoming ……..:    64        68      89.0      101.0      5,696      6,868
:
Other States 1/ :    126        122      60.3      61.0      7,599      7,437
:
United States ..:  3,000      2,633      71.7      71.2    215,078    187,375
———————————————————————————-
1/ Other States include Delaware, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, New York, North
Carolina, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Individual State estimates will be
published in the “Small Grains 2014 Summary.”

Winter Wheat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and
Forecasted July 1, 2014
—————————————————————————————–
:  Area harvested  :      Yield per acre      :      Production
:————————————————————————
State    :        :        :        :      2014        :          :
:  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :——————-:  2013    :  2014
:        :        :        : June 1  : July 1  :          :
—————————————————————————————–
:    1,000 acres      ——- bushels ——-    — 1,000 bushels —
:
Arkansas …….:    615      370    62.0    62.0      62.0        38,130      22,940
California …..:    340      180    80.0    80.0      85.0        27,200      15,300
Colorado …….:  1,640    2,400    27.0    35.0      36.0        44,280      86,400
Georgia ……..:    350      250    60.0    58.0      55.0        21,000      13,750
Idaho ……….:    720      730    86.0    85.0      85.0        61,920      62,050
Illinois …….:    830      690    67.0    66.0      67.0        55,610      46,230
Indiana ……..:    440      360    73.0    68.0      68.0        32,120      24,480
Kansas ………:  8,400    8,400    38.0    29.0      28.0      319,200    235,200
Kentucky …….:    610      530    75.0    73.0      70.0        45,750      37,100
Maryland …….:    260      255    67.0    65.0      65.0        17,420      16,575
:
Michigan …….:    600      510    75.0    69.0      70.0        45,000      35,700
Mississippi ….:    385      200    58.0    63.0      63.0        22,330      12,600
Missouri …….:  1,000      850    56.0    55.0      55.0        56,000      46,750
Montana ……..:  1,900    2,250    43.0    42.0      42.0        81,700      94,500
Nebraska …….:  1,130    1,400    35.0    40.0      40.0        39,550      56,000
New York …….:    115        95    68.0    66.0      66.0        7,820      6,270
North Carolina .:    920      760    57.0    60.0      59.0        52,440      44,840
North Dakota …:    205      560    43.0    46.0      47.0        8,815      26,320
Ohio ………..:    665      570    70.0    67.0      68.0        46,550      38,760
Oklahoma …….:  3,400    3,000    31.0    18.0      17.0      105,400      51,000
:
Oregon ………:    780      720    62.0    58.0      55.0        48,360      39,600
Pennsylvania …:    160      165    68.0    60.0      63.0        10,880      10,395
South Carolina .:    255      220    54.0    53.0      51.0        13,770      11,220
South Dakota …:    670    1,170    39.0    45.0      46.0        26,130      53,820
Tennessee ……:    540      480    71.0    70.0      68.0        38,340      32,640
Texas ……….:  2,250    2,200    29.0    25.0      25.0        65,250      55,000
Virginia …….:    275      265    62.0    62.0      65.0        17,050      17,225
Washington …..:  1,660    1,620    69.0    68.0      66.0      114,540    106,920
Wisconsin ……:    265      260    58.0    69.0      67.0        15,370      17,420
:
Other States 1/ :  1,022      959    55.1    52.9      52.6        56,328      50,427
:
United States ..: 32,402    32,419    47.4    42.4      42.2    1,534,253  1,367,432
—————————————————————————————–
1/ Other States include Alabama, Arizona, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota,
Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Individual State
level estimates will be published in the “Small Grains 2014 Summary.”

Durum Wheat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2013 and
Forecasted July 1, 2014
————————————————————————————————
:    Area harvested    :        Yield per acre        :      Production
:——————————————————————————-
State    :          :          :          :      2014        :          :
:  2013    :  2014    :  2013    :——————-:  2013    :  2014
:          :          :          : June 1  : July 1  :          :
————————————————————————————————
:  — 1,000 acres —      ——— bushels ——–        1,000 bushels
:
Arizona ……..:      79          69      102.0      110.0    110.0      8,058      7,590
California …..:      67          50      100.0      100.0    100.0      6,700      5,000
Montana ……..:    490        435        34.0        (X)      32.0    16,660      13,920
North Dakota …:    770        850        38.5        (X)      38.0    29,645      32,300
:
Other States 1/ :      15          14        56.7        (X)      59.6        850        835
:
United States ..:  1,421      1,418        43.6        (X)      42.1    61,913      59,645
————————————————————————————————
(X) Not applicable.
1/  Other States include Idaho and South Dakota. Individual State level estimates will be
published in the “Small Grains 2014 Summary.”

Other Spring Wheat Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and
United States: 2013 and
Forecasted July 1, 2014
———————————————————————————-
:  Area harvested    :  Yield per acre    :    Production
State    :—————————————————————–
:  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :  2014
———————————————————————————-
:  — 1,000 acres —      — bushels —        1,000 bushels
:
Idaho ……….:    510        500      77.0      75.0      39,270    37,500
Minnesota ……:  1,160      1,260      57.0      52.0      66,120    65,520
Montana ……..:  2,830      2,850      37.0      35.0    104,710    99,750
North Dakota …:  5,060      5,800      46.5      46.0    235,290    266,800
Oregon ………:      88        87      63.0      63.0      5,544      5,481
South Dakota …:  1,165      1,270      44.0      43.0      51,260    54,610
Washington …..:    495        605      60.0      55.0      29,700    33,275
:
Other States 1/ :      26        31      62.9      54.5      1,635      1,690
:
United States ..:  11,334    12,403      47.1      45.5    533,529    564,626
———————————————————————————-
1/ Other States include Colorado, Nevada, and Utah. Individual State level
estimates will be published in the “Small Grains 2014 Summary.”

Wheat Production by Class – United States: 2013 and Forecasted July 1, 2014
[Wheat class estimates are based on the latest available data including both surveys and
administrative data. The previous end-of-year season class percentages are used throughout the
forecast season for States that do not have survey or administrative data available]
———————————————————————————————–
Crop        :                2013                :                2014
———————————————————————————————–
:                              1,000 bushels
:
Winter              :
Hard red …………:              744,029                              702,963
Soft red …………:              564,907                              458,077
Hard white ……….:                11,154                              10,571
Soft white ……….:              214,163                              195,821
:
Spring              :
Hard red …………:              490,394                              520,455
Hard white ……….:                10,502                              10,282
Soft white ……….:                32,633                              33,889
Durum ……………:                61,913                              59,645
:
Total …………  :            2,129,695                            1,991,703
———————————————————————————————–

Utilized Production of Citrus Fruits by Crop – States and United States: 2012-2013 and
Forecasted July 1, 2014
[The crop year begins with the bloom of the first year shown and ends with the completion of harvest the
following year]
————————————————————————————————————–
:    Utilized production boxes 1/      :  Utilized production ton equivalent
Crop and State        :——————————————————————————-
:    2012-2013    :    2013-2014    :    2012-2013    :    2013-2014
————————————————————————————————————–
:      ——- 1,000 boxes ——-              ——- 1,000 tons ——
Oranges                      :
Early, mid, and Navel 2/      :
California ……………..:      42,500              42,000              1,700              1,680
Florida ………………..:      67,100              53,300              3,020              2,399
Texas ………………….:        1,499              1,400                64                  60
:
United States …………..:      111,099              96,700              4,784              4,139
:
Valencia                      :
California ……………..:      12,000              12,000                480                480
Florida ………………..:      66,500              51,100              2,993              2,300
Texas ………………….:          289                376                12                  16
:
United States …………..:      78,789              63,476              3,485              2,796
:
All                          :
California ……………..:      54,500              54,000              2,180              2,160
Florida ………………..:      133,600            104,400              6,013              4,699
Texas ………………….:        1,788              1,776                76                  76
:
United States …………..:      189,888            160,176              8,269              6,935
:
Grapefruit                    :
White                        :
Florida ………………..:        5,250              4,150                223                176
:
Colored                      :
Florida ………………..:      13,100              11,500                557                489
:
All                          :
California ……………..:        4,500              4,000                180                160
Florida ………………..:      18,350              15,650                780                665
Texas ………………….:        6,100              5,700                244                228
:
United States …………..:      28,950              25,350              1,204              1,053
:
Tangerines and mandarins      :
Arizona 3/ ……………….:          200                200                  8                  8
California 3/ …………….:      13,000              13,000                520                520
Florida ………………….:        3,280              2,950                156                140
:
United States …………….:      16,480              16,150                684                668
:
Lemons                        :
Arizona ………………….:        1,800              1,785                72                  71
California ……………….:      21,000              20,000                840                800
:
United States …………….:      22,800              21,785                912                871
:
Tangelos                      :
Florida ………………….:        1,000                880                45                  40
————————————————————————————————————–
1/ Net pounds per box: oranges in California-80, Florida-90, Texas-85; grapefruit in California-80,
Florida-85, Texas-80; tangerines and mandarins in Arizona and California-80, Florida-95; lemons-80;
tangelos-90.
2/ Navel and miscellaneous varieties in California. Early (including Navel) and midseason varieties in Florida
and Texas. Small quantities of tangerines in Texas and Temples in Florida.
3/ Includes tangelos and tangors.

Tobacco Area Harvested, Yield, and Production by Class – States and United States:
2013 and Forecasted July 1, 2014
————————————————————————————–
:  Area harvested  :Yield per acre :    Production
Class and type      :———————————————————
:  2013  :  2014  : 2013  : 2014  :  2013  :  2014
————————————————————————————–
: —– acres —–  — pounds —  — 1,000 pounds —
:
Class 1, Flue-cured (11-14) :
Georgia ………………..:  12,800    14,000  1,750  2,500    22,400    35,000
North Carolina ………….: 180,000  181,000  2,000  2,300  360,000    416,300
South Carolina ………….:  14,500    15,000  1,700  2,300    24,650    34,500
Virginia ……………….:  21,500    22,000  2,200  2,300    47,300    50,600
:
United States …………..: 228,800  232,000  1,986  2,312  454,350    536,400
————————————————————————————–

Miscellaneous Fruits and Nuts Production by Crop – States and
United States: 2013 and
Forecasted July 1, 2014
—————————————————————————-
:                Total production
Crop and State      :————————————————-
:        2013 1/        :          2014
—————————————————————————-
:                      tons
:
Apricots                  :
California ……………:            (NA)                  55,000
Utah …………………:            (NA)                      190
Washington ……………:            (NA)                    6,300
:
United States …………:            (NA)                  61,490
:
:                  1,000 pounds
:
Almonds, shelled basis 2/ :
California ……………:        2,010,000                2,100,000
—————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.
1/  Estimates for 2013 will be published on July 17, 2014.
2/  Utilized production.

Fall Potato Percent of Acreage Planted by Type of Potato – Selected States and
Total: 2013 and 2014
[Predominant type shown may include small portion of other type(s) constituting less
than 1 percent of State’s total. Blue types are reported under red types]
————————————————————————————-
State    :      Red      :      White      :    Yellow      :    Russet
:———————————————————————–
:  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :  2014  :  2013  :  2014
————————————————————————————-
:                                percent
:
Colorado ….:    4        5      10      15      8        10      78      70
Idaho …….:    3        3        4        4      2        2      91      91
Maine …….:    3        3      42      43      2        3      53      51
Michigan ….:    1        1      84      83      1        1      14      15
Minnesota …:  20      23      11        6      1        2      68      69
New York ….:    3        3      93      92      3        4        1        1
North Dakota :  24      22      30      33      1        1      45      44
Oregon ……:    3        3      16      16      3        3      78      78
Pennsylvania :    6        4      88      87      5        8        1        1
Washington ..:    5        4        8      10      3        3      84      83
Wisconsin …:    8        9      38      34      1        2      53      55
:
Total …….:    7        6      20      20      2        3      71      71
————————————————————————————-

Fall Potato Area Planted for Certified Seed – Selected States and Total:
2013 and 2014
[Data supplied by State seed certification officials]
————————————————————————————-
:                      2013 Crop                      :    2014 Crop
:———————————————————————–
State    :  Entered for  :                :    Percent    :  Entered for
:  certification  :    Certified    :    certified    :  certification
————————————————————————————-
:    ——— acres ———          percent            acres
:
Alaska ……:        76                76            100              (NA)
California ..:        815                815            100                800
Colorado ….:    13,256              9,737              73            12,895
Idaho …….:      (NA)            33,101            (X)              (NA)
Maine …….:    10,794            10,794            100            10,750
Michigan ….:      2,253              2,242            100              2,250
Minnesota …:      6,564              5,385              82              (NA)
Montana …..:    10,136            10,136            100              9,607
Nebraska ….:      6,106              6,097            100              6,015
New York ….:        618                618            100                627
:
North Dakota :    17,953            14,170              79              (NA)
Oregon ……:      2,531              2,460              97              2,736
Pennsylvania :        343                325              95                343
Washington ..:      3,065              3,052            100              3,212
Wisconsin …:      8,404              8,404            100              (NA)
:
Total …….:        (X)            107,412            (X)                (X)
————————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.
(X)  Not applicable.

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units –
United States: 2013 and 2014
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2014 crop year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————–
:    Area planted      :    Area harvested
Crop              :———————————————–
:  2013    :  2014    :  2013    :  2014
——————————————————————————–
:                  1,000 acres
:
Grains and hay                  :
Barley …………………….:    3,480      3,091      3,000      2,633
Corn for grain 1/ …………..:  95,365      91,641      87,668      83,839
Corn for silage …………….:    (NA)                  6,256
Hay, all …………………..:    (NA)        (NA)      58,257      57,646
Alfalfa ………………….:    (NA)        (NA)      17,763      18,190
All other ………………..:    (NA)        (NA)      40,494      39,456
Oats ………………………:    3,010      3,027      1,030      1,153
Proso millet ……………….:      720        470        638
Rice ………………………:    2,489      3,047      2,468      3,026
Rye ……………………….:    1,446      1,429        278        306
Sorghum for grain 1/ ………..:    8,061      7,471      6,530      6,399
Sorghum for silage ………….:    (NA)                    380
Wheat, all …………………:  56,156      56,474      45,157      46,240
Winter …………………..:  43,090      42,296      32,402      32,419
Durum ……………………:    1,470      1,469      1,421      1,418
Other spring ……………..:  11,596      12,709      11,334      12,403
:
Oilseeds                        :
Canola …………………….:  1,348.0    1,753.0    1,264.5    1,672.2
Cottonseed …………………:      (X)        (X)        (X)
Flaxseed …………………..:      181        332        172        324
Mustard seed ……………….:    45.0        36.0        43.4        34.5
Peanuts ……………………:  1,067.0    1,315.0    1,042.0    1,280.0
Rapeseed …………………..:      1.7        2.6        1.7        2.5
Safflower ………………….:    175.5      183.5      170.0      176.2
Soybeans for beans ………….:  76,533      84,839      75,869      84,058
Sunflower ………………….:  1,575.5    1,705.0    1,474.6    1,630.1
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:
Cotton, all ………………..: 10,407.0    11,369.0    7,544.4
Upland …………………..: 10,206.0    11,191.0    7,345.0
American Pima …………….:    201.0      178.0      199.4
Sugarbeets …………………:  1,198.1    1,162.1    1,154.0    1,134.1
Sugarcane ………………….:    (NA)        (NA)      910.8      879.0
Tobacco ……………………:    (NA)        (NA)      355.7      358.9
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils    :
Austrian winter peas ………..:    18.0        28.5        14.1
Dry edible beans ……………:  1,354.7    1,748.7    1,311.3    1,679.1
Dry edible peas …………….:    860.0      921.0      797.0
Lentils ……………………:    362.0      320.0      347.0
Wrinkled seed peas ………….:    (NA)                    (NA)
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous      :
Coffee (Hawaii) …………….:    (NA)                    7.3
Hops ………………………:    (NA)        (NA)        35.2        38.4
Peppermint oil ……………..:    (NA)                    68.8
Potatoes, all ………………:  1,066.5    1,082.2    1,052.0    1,067.4
Spring …………………..:    75.9        73.8        72.9        72.3
Summer …………………..:    48.7        53.0        47.5        51.9
Fall …………………….:    941.9      955.4      931.6      943.2
Spearmint oil ………………:    (NA)                    24.5
Sweet potatoes ……………..:    115.7      133.0      113.2      130.0
Taro (Hawaii) 2/ ……………:    (NA)                    0.4
——————————————————————————–
See footnote(s) at end of table.                                    –continued

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units –
United States: 2013 and 2014 (continued)
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or from
previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2014 crop year. Blank data
cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————————
:  Yield per acre    :      Production
Crop                  :———————————————-
:  2013  :  2014  :    2013    :  2014
—————————————————————————————
:                      ——– 1,000 ——-
:
Grains and hay                          :
Barley ……………………..bushels:  71.7      71.2        215,078    187,375
Corn for grain ………………bushels:  158.8                13,925,147
Corn for silage ………………..tons:  18.8                  117,851
Hay, all ………………………tons:  2.33                  135,946
Alfalfa ……………………..tons:  3.24                    57,581
All other ……………………tons:  1.94                    78,365
Oats ……………………….bushels:  64.0      65.5        65,879      75,507
Proso millet ………………..bushels:  28.9                    18,436
Rice 3/ ………………………..cwt:  7,694                  189,886
Rye ………………………..bushels:  27.6                    7,669
Sorghum for grain ……………bushels:  59.6                  389,046
Sorghum for silage ……………..tons:  14.3                    5,420
Wheat, all ………………….bushels:  47.2      43.1      2,129,695  1,991,703
Winter ……………………bushels:  47.4      42.2      1,534,253  1,367,432
Durum …………………….bushels:  43.6      42.1        61,913      59,645
Other spring ………………bushels:  47.1      45.5        533,529    564,626
:
Oilseeds                                :
Canola ………………………pounds:  1,748                2,210,505
Cottonseed …………………….tons:    (X)                  4,203.0
Flaxseed ……………………bushels:  19.5                    3,356
Mustard seed …………………pounds:    846                    36,727
Peanuts ……………………..pounds:  4,006                4,174,180
Rapeseed …………………….pounds:  1,141                    1,940
Safflower ……………………pounds:  1,232                  209,461
Soybeans for beans …………..bushels:  43.3                3,288,833
Sunflower ……………………pounds:  1,378                2,032,725
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops        :
Cotton, all 3/ ………………..bales:    821                  12,909.2
Upland 3/ …………………..bales:    802                  12,275.0
American Pima 3/ …………….bales:  1,527                    634.2
Sugarbeets …………………….tons:  28.4                    32,813
Sugarcane ……………………..tons:  33.8                    30,761
Tobacco ……………………..pounds:  2,034                  723,579
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils            :
Austrian winter peas 3/ ………….cwt:  1,617                      228
Dry edible beans 3/ ……………..cwt:  1,867                    24,486
Dry edible peas 3/ ………………cwt:  1,960                    15,620
Lentils 3/ ……………………..cwt:  1,446                    5,019
Wrinkled seed peas ………………cwt:  (NA)                      275
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous              :
Coffee (Hawaii) ………………pounds:    960                    7,000
Hops ………………………..pounds:  1,969                  69,343.9
Peppermint oil ……………….pounds:    89                    6,132
Potatoes, all …………………..cwt:    416                  437,483
Spring ……………………….cwt:    304        290        22,137      20,991
Summer ……………………….cwt:    363                    17,240
Fall …………………………cwt:    427                  398,106
Spearmint oil ………………..pounds:    119                    2,926
Sweet potatoes ………………….cwt:    219                    24,785
Taro (Hawaii) ………………..pounds:  (NA)                    3,100
—————————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
(X)  Not applicable.
1/  Area planted for all purposes.
2/  Area is total acres in crop, not harvested acres.
3/  Yield in pounds.

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units –
United States: 2013 and 2014
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2014 crop year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————–
:    Area planted      :    Area harvested
Crop              :———————————————–
:  2013    :  2014    :  2013    :  2014
——————————————————————————–
:                  hectares
:
Grains and hay                  :
Barley …………………….: 1,408,320  1,250,900  1,214,070  1,065,550
Corn for grain 1/ …………..:38,593,260  37,086,200  35,478,360  33,928,800
Corn for silage …………….:      (NA)              2,531,740
Hay, all 2/ ………………..:      (NA)        (NA)  23,576,030  23,328,760
Alfalfa ………………….:      (NA)        (NA)  7,188,510  7,361,310
All other ………………..:      (NA)        (NA)  16,387,520  15,967,450
Oats ………………………: 1,218,120  1,225,000    416,830    466,610
Proso millet ……………….:  291,380    190,200    258,190
Rice ………………………: 1,007,270  1,233,090    998,770  1,224,590
Rye ……………………….:  585,180    578,300    112,500    123,840
Sorghum for grain 1/ ………..: 3,262,210  3,023,440  2,642,630  2,589,610
Sorghum for silage ………….:      (NA)                153,780
Wheat, all 2/ ………………:22,725,770  22,854,460  18,274,590  18,712,870
Winter …………………..:17,438,090  17,116,770  13,112,770  13,119,650
Durum ……………………:  594,890    594,490    575,060    573,850
Other spring ……………..: 4,692,790  5,143,210  4,586,760  5,019,370
:
Oilseeds                        :
Canola …………………….:  545,520    709,420    511,730    676,720
Cottonseed …………………:      (X)        (X)        (X)
Flaxseed …………………..:    73,250    134,360      69,610    131,120
Mustard seed ……………….:    18,210      14,570      17,560      13,960
Peanuts ……………………:  431,800    532,170    421,690    518,000
Rapeseed …………………..:      690      1,050        690      1,010
Safflower ………………….:    71,020      74,260      68,800      71,310
Soybeans for beans ………….:30,972,140  34,333,490  30,703,430  34,017,430
Sunflower ………………….:  637,590    690,000    596,760    659,690
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:
Cotton, all 2/ ……………..: 4,211,610  4,600,920  3,053,140
Upland …………………..: 4,130,270  4,528,890  2,972,450
American Pima …………….:    81,340      72,030      80,700
Sugarbeets …………………:  484,860    470,290    467,010    458,960
Sugarcane ………………….:      (NA)        (NA)    368,590    355,720
Tobacco ……………………:      (NA)        (NA)    143,940    145,240
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils    :
Austrian winter peas ………..:    7,280      11,530      5,710
Dry edible beans ……………:  548,230    707,680    530,670    679,510
Dry edible peas …………….:  348,030    372,720    322,540
Lentils ……………………:  146,500    129,500    140,430
Wrinkled seed peas ………….:      (NA)                    (NA)
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous      :
Coffee (Hawaii) …………….:      (NA)                  2,950
Hops ………………………:      (NA)        (NA)      14,250      15,540
Peppermint oil ……………..:      (NA)                  27,840
Potatoes, all 2/ ……………:  431,600    437,960    425,730    431,970
Spring …………………..:    30,720      29,870      29,500      29,260
Summer …………………..:    19,710      21,450      19,220      21,000
Fall …………………….:  381,180    386,640    377,010    381,700
Spearmint oil ………………:      (NA)                  9,910
Sweet potatoes ……………..:    46,820      53,820      45,810      52,610
Taro (Hawaii) 3/ ……………:      (NA)                    160
——————————————————————————–
See footnote(s) at end of table.                                    –continued

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units –
United States: 2013 and 2014 (continued)
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2014 crop year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————–
:  Yield per hectare  :      Production
Crop              :———————————————–
:  2013    :  2014    :  2013    :  2014
——————————————————————————–
:                  metric tons
:
Grains and hay                  :
Barley …………………….:    3.86        3.83      4,682,770  4,079,610
Corn for grain ……………..:    9.97                353,715,030
Corn for silage …………….:  42.23                106,912,630
Hay, all 2/ ………………..:    5.23                123,328,140
Alfalfa ………………….:    7.27                52,236,600
All other ………………..:    4.34                71,091,530
Oats ………………………:    2.29        2.35        956,230  1,095,980
Proso millet ……………….:    1.62                    418,120
Rice ………………………:    8.62                  8,613,080
Rye ……………………….:    1.73                    194,800
Sorghum for grain …………..:    3.74                  9,882,220
Sorghum for silage ………….:  31.97                  4,916,940
Wheat, all 2/ ………………:    3.17        2.90    57,960,800 54,205,270
Winter …………………..:    3.18        2.84    41,755,520 37,215,400
Durum ……………………:    2.93        2.83      1,685,000  1,623,270
Other spring ……………..:    3.17        3.06    14,520,280 15,366,600
:
Oilseeds                        :
Canola …………………….:    1.96                  1,002,670
Cottonseed …………………:    (X)                  3,812,900
Flaxseed …………………..:    1.22                    85,250
Mustard seed ……………….:    0.95                    16,660
Peanuts ……………………:    4.49                  1,893,380
Rapeseed …………………..:    1.28                        880
Safflower ………………….:    1.38                    95,010
Soybeans for beans ………….:    2.92                89,507,370
Sunflower ………………….:    1.55                    922,030
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:
Cotton, all 2/ ……………..:    0.92                  2,810,650
Upland …………………..:    0.90                  2,672,570
American Pima …………….:    1.71                    138,080
Sugarbeets …………………:  63.74                29,767,450
Sugarcane ………………….:  75.71                27,905,910
Tobacco ……………………:    2.28                    328,210
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils    :
Austrian winter peas ………..:    1.81                    10,340
Dry edible beans ……………:    2.09                  1,110,670
Dry edible peas …………….:    2.20                    708,510
Lentils ……………………:    1.62                    227,660
Wrinkled seed peas ………….:    (NA)                    12,470
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous      :
Coffee (Hawaii) …………….:    1.07                      3,180
Hops ………………………:    2.21                    31,450
Peppermint oil ……………..:    0.10                      2,780
Potatoes, all 2/ ……………:  46.61                19,843,900
Spring …………………..:  34.04      32.54      1,004,120    952,140
Summer …………………..:  40.68                    781,990
Fall …………………….:  47.90                18,057,790
Spearmint oil ………………:    0.13                      1,330
Sweet potatoes ……………..:  24.54                  1,124,230
Taro (Hawaii) ………………:    (NA)                      1,410
——————————————————————————–
(NA) Not available.
(X)  Not applicable.
1/  Area planted for all purposes.
2/  Total may not add due to rounding.
3/  Area is total hectares in crop, not harvested hectares.

Fruits and Nuts Production in Domestic Units – United States: 2013 and 2014
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2014 crop year,
except citrus which is for the 2013-2014 season. Blank data cells indicate
estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————-
:            Production
Crop                  :———————————–
:      2013      :      2014
——————————————————————————-
:              1,000
:
Citrus 1/                                  :
Grapefruit ……………………….tons:        1,204            1,053
Lemons …………………………..tons:          912              871
Oranges ………………………….tons:        8,269            6,935
Tangelos (Florida) ………………..tons:          45                40
Tangerines and mandarins …………..tons:          684              668
:
Noncitrus                                  :
Apples ………………….. 1,000 pounds:
Apricots …………………………tons:                          61.5
Bananas (Hawaii) ………………..pounds:
Grapes …………………………..tons:
Olives (California) ……………….tons:
Papayas (Hawaii) ………………..pounds:
Peaches ………………………….tons:
Pears ……………………………tons:
Prunes, dried (California) …………tons:        85.0              95.0
Prunes and plums (excludes California) tons:
:
Nuts and miscellaneous                    :
Almonds, shelled (California) …….pounds:    2,010,000        2,100,000
Hazelnuts, in-shell (Oregon) ……….tons:
Pecans, in-shell ………………..pounds:
Walnuts, in-shell (California) ……..tons:
Maple syrup ……………………gallons:        3,523            3,167
——————————————————————————-
1/ Production years are 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

Fruits and Nuts Production in Metric Units – United States: 2013 and 2014
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2014 crop year,
except citrus which is for the 2013-2014 season. Blank data cells indicate
estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————-
:            Production
Crop                  :———————————–
:      2013      :      2014
——————————————————————————-
:            metric tons
:
Citrus 1/                                  :
Grapefruit …………………………..:    1,092,250          955,270
Lemons ………………………………:      827,350          790,160
Oranges ……………………………..:    7,501,510        6,291,330
Tangelos (Florida) ……………………:      40,820            36,290
Tangerines and mandarins ………………:      620,510          606,000
:
Noncitrus                                  :
Apples ………………………………:
Apricots …………………………….:                        55,780
Bananas (Hawaii) ……………………..:
Grapes ………………………………:
Olives (California) …………………..:
Papayas (Hawaii) ……………………..:
Peaches ……………………………..:
Pears ……………………………….:
Prunes, dried (California) …………….:      77,110            86,180
Prunes and plums (excludes California) ….:
:
Nuts and miscellaneous                    :
Almonds, shelled (California) ………….:      911,720          952,540
Hazelnuts, in-shell (Oregon) …………..:
Pecans, in-shell ……………………..:
Walnuts, in-shell (California) …………:
Maple syrup ………………………….:      17,610            15,830
——————————————————————————-
1/ Production years are 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

Winter Wheat for Grain Objective Yield Data

The National Agricultural Statistics Service is conducting objective yield
surveys in 10 winter wheat-producing States during 2014. Randomly selected
plots in winter wheat for grain fields are visited monthly from May through
harvest to obtain specific counts and measurements. Data in these tables are
based on counts from this survey.

Winter Wheat Objective Yield Percent of Samples Processed in the Lab –
United States: 2010-2014
[Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————
:      June        :      July        :      August
Year    :———————————————————–
:    Mature 1/    :    Mature 1/    :    Mature 1/
—————————————————————————
:                          percent
:
2010 ……….:        8                  58                  87
2011 ……….:        24                  60                  86
2012 ……….:        57                  77                  92
2013 ……….:        12                  55                  92
2014 ……….:        15                  58
—————————————————————————
1/ Includes winter wheat in the hard dough stage or beyond and are
considered mature or almost mature.

Winter Wheat Heads per Square Foot – Selected States: 2010-2014
[Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
———————————————————————————–
State        :  2010    :    2011    :    2012    :  2013    :  2014 1/
———————————————————————————–
:                          number
:
Colorado            :
July …………….:  47.3        45.3        41.0        32.1        42.4
August …………..:  48.6        45.0        41.0        31.9
Final ……………:  48.6        45.0        41.0        31.9
:
Illinois            :
July …………….:  44.5        60.0        56.5        60.9        63.5
August …………..:  44.5        60.1        56.5        61.2
Final ……………:  44.5        60.1        56.5        61.2
:
Kansas              :
July …………….:  44.6        42.2        46.5        50.4        36.4
August …………..:  44.6        42.2        46.7        50.4
Final ……………:  44.6        42.2        46.7        50.4
:
Missouri            :
July …………….:  39.8        50.7        49.9        54.6        51.2
August …………..:  39.2        48.9        49.9        55.8
Final ……………:  39.2        48.9        49.9        55.8
:
Montana              :
July …………….:  44.7        44.3        44.1        43.7        43.4
August …………..:  44.7        46.7        44.7        45.1
Final ……………:  45.0        46.9        45.0        45.1
:
Nebraska            :
July …………….:  47.1        54.3        50.7        38.5        48.2
August …………..:  48.1        54.6        50.7        38.8
Final ……………:  48.1        54.6        50.7        38.8
:
Ohio                :
July …………….:  62.1        56.1        58.3        53.0        58.8
August …………..:  62.1        56.2        58.3        54.0
Final ……………:  62.1        56.2        58.3        54.0
:
Oklahoma            :
July …………….:  36.5        37.7        47.7        51.7        34.9
August …………..:  36.5        37.7        47.7        51.7
Final ……………:  36.5        37.7        47.7        51.7
:
Texas                :
July …………….:  35.9        32.7        34.3        33.3        32.8
August …………..:  35.9        32.8        34.3        33.3
Final ……………:  35.9        32.9        34.3        33.0
:
Washington          :
July …………….:  40.2        41.3        37.3        38.0        32.3
August …………..:  39.2        41.5        36.6        38.6
Final ……………:  39.2        41.4        36.9        38.6
———————————————————————————–
1/ Final head counts will be published in the “Small Grains 2014 Summary.”

June Weather Summary

Abundant June rainfall from the Plains to the East Coast provided generally
beneficial moisture for rangeland, pastures, and summer crops. However,
rainfall became locally excessive in some areas, particularly across the
upper Midwest, leading to submerged crops and lowland flooding. By July 5-6,
the Mississippi River rose to its third-highest level on record, behind July
1993 and June 2008, from New Boston, Illinois, downstream to Burlington,
Iowa. Despite the pockets of wetness, along with isolated wind and hail
damage, three-quarters of the United States corn was rated in good to
excellent condition on June 29-the first such late-June occurrence since
2003.

The heavy rain also caused delays in fieldwork, including winter wheat
harvesting, across the central Plains and lower Midwest. By June 29, the
wheat harvest in Kansas and Missouri was more than 20 percentage points
behind the respective five-year State averages. However, the rain also
boosted good to excellent crop ratings by month’s end to 72 percent of the
Nation’s soybeans and peanuts; 70 percent of the spring wheat; 69 percent of
the rice; 59 percent of the sorghum; 58 percent of the rangeland and pasture;
and 53 percent of the cotton.

On the southern Plains, a second consecutive month of drought-easing rainfall
improved prospects for summer crops and aided rangeland and pastures. Despite
the drought relief, subsoil moisture was rated at least half very short to
short on June 29 in New Mexico (67 percent), Oklahoma (64 percent), Texas
(52 percent), and Colorado (52 percent). Meanwhile, pockets of short-term
dryness developed during June in the Southeast. By June 29, topsoil moisture
was rated 61 percent very short to short in South Carolina.

June warmth prevailed from the Mississippi River eastward and from California
into the Southwest. In contrast, cooler-than-normal June conditions stretched
from the Pacific Northwest to the northern Plains. In the latter region, cool
weather maintained a slow pace of development for late-planted crops,
including corn, soybeans, and spring wheat.

Elsewhere, light June showers were insufficient to provide relief from
increasingly dry conditions in the Northwest, while dry weather and periods
of heat boosted irrigation demands in drought-stricken areas from California
into the Southwest. By June 29, more than one-quarter of Washington’s spring
wheat (28 percent) and winter wheat (27 percent) was rated very poor to poor.

June Agricultural Summary

Notable areas of high precipitation occurred during the month of June in
portions of the northern Great Plains and the lower Mississippi Valley. Areas
of Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Tennessee recorded over
12 inches of precipitation for the month. Early in the month, storms brought
high winds, minor hail damage, and flooding to portions of Tennessee. The
second half of the month brought heavy rainfall to the northern Great Plains
and upper Midwest that left the soil saturated, stressing crops and delaying
efforts to finish planting in the region. Average temperatures were generally
within 2°F of normal for the month, with the exception of the northern Rocky
Mountains, where some areas were more than 4°F below normal.

Ninety-five percent of this year’s corn crop was planted by June 1,
five percentage points ahead of last year and slightly ahead of the five-year
average. Nationally, 92 percent of the corn crop had emerged by June 8,
nine percentage points ahead of last year and 2 percentage points ahead of
the five-year average. Above-average temperatures throughout the Corn Belt
during the month aided crop development but untimely rains in some areas
prevented post-planting fieldwork. By June 29, five percent of this year’s
corn crop was silking. This was 2 percentage points ahead of last year but
4 percentage points behind the five-year average. Overall, 75 percent of the
corn crop was reported in good to excellent condition on June 29,
eight percentage points above the same time last year.

By June 1, producers had planted 56 percent of this year’s sorghum crop,
5 percentage points ahead of last year but slightly behind the five-year
average. National planting progress remained at or slightly behind the
five-year average for the entire month of June. In Kansas, planting progress
was 16 percentage points behind the State’s five-year average pace on June 15
but favorable planting conditions in the final weeks allowed producers to
accelerate planting progress and get closer to normal levels. With activity
limited to Louisiana and Texas, 17 percent of the Nation’s sorghum crop was
headed by June 15, equal to the same time last year but slightly behind the
five-year average. Producers in southern areas of Texas reported spraying for
an infestation of sugarcane aphids throughout the month. By June 29,
producers had planted 93 percent of the sorghum crop, 3 percentage points
behind both last year and the five-year average. Nationally, 21 percent of
the sorghum crop was at or beyond the heading stage by June 29,
two percentage points behind both last year and the five-year average.
Overall, 59 percent of the sorghum crop was reported in good to excellent
condition, up 6 percentage points from June 15 and 10 percentage points above
the same time last year.

Oat producers had sown 95 percent of this year’s crop by June 1, slightly
ahead of the previous year but 2 percentage points behind the five-year
average. Nationwide, 86 percent of the oat crop had emerged by June 1, also
slightly ahead of the previous year but 4 percentage points behind the five-
year average. Thirty-two percent of the Nation’s oat crop was at or beyond
the heading stage by June 1, two percentage points ahead of last year but
2 percentage points behind the five-year average. By the end of the month,
heading progress was at or behind five-year average levels in all estimating
States except South Dakota. Nationwide, 69 percent of the oat crop was at or
beyond the heading stage by June 29, five percentage points ahead of last
year but 4 percentage points behind the five-year average. Overall,
64 percent of the oat crop was reported in good to excellent condition on
June 29, compared with 62 percent on June 1 and 59 percent at the same time
last year.

By June 1, ninety-three percent of the barley crop was seeded, 11 percentage
points ahead of last year and 4 percentage points ahead of the five-year
average. Seventy-six percent of the barley crop had emerged by June 1,
sixteen percentage points ahead of last year and 7 percentage points ahead of
the five-year average. By June 22, a majority of the crop had reached the
heading stage in Idaho and Washington, while the crop had just begun heading
in Minnesota and North Dakota. Seventeen percent of the Nation’s barley crop
was at or beyond the heading stage by June 22, slightly ahead of last year
and 4 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Thirty-one percent of
the barley crop was at or beyond the heading stage by June 29,
five percentage points ahead of last year and 6 percentage points ahead of
the five-year average. By the end of the month, barley development was well
ahead of normal in the Pacific Northwest, but heading progress was
29 percentage points behind the five-year average in Minnesota. Overall,
68 percent of the barley crop was reported in good to excellent condition on
June 29, compared with 67 percent on June 1 and 68 percent at the same time
last year.

Heading of this year’s winter wheat crop advanced to 79 percent by June 1,
eight percentage points ahead of last year and slightly ahead of the
five-year average. Producers in parts of Oklahoma reported good rains at the
beginning of the month but they came too late to revive drought-stricken
wheat. By the week ending June 8, winter wheat harvest had begun in Arkansas,
North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Texas, with 9 percent of this year’s winter
wheat crop harvested Nationwide. By June 29, winter wheat producers had
harvested 43 percent of the Nation’s crop, 3 percentage points ahead of last
year but 5 percentage points behind the five-year average. Crop conditions
for winter wheat held steady at 30 percent in the good to excellent
categories throughout the month of June.

Producers had sown 88 percent of the spring wheat crop by June 1,
eight percentage points ahead of last year but equal to the five-year
average. Sixty-seven percent of the spring wheat crop had emerged by June 1,
nine percentage points ahead of last year but 5 percentage points behind the
five-year average. Nationally, 26 percent of the spring wheat crop was at or
beyond the heading stage by June 29. This was 10 percentage points ahead of
last year but 3 percentage points behind the five-year average. Spring wheat
progress remained behind normal in the upper Midwest due to delayed planting,
with Minnesota 28 percentage points behind the five-year average in the
heading stage. Overall, 70 percent of the spring wheat crop was reported in
good to excellent condition, compared with 71 percent on June 8 and
68 percent at the same time last year.

Nationally, emergence of the rice crop reached 89 percent by June 1,
three percentage points ahead of both last year and the five-year average.
Emergence was virtually complete by June 15. Producers in Arkansas reported
that heavy rainfall delayed fertilization and flooding of rice fields. By
June 29, nine percent of this year’s rice crop was at or beyond the heading
stage, 3 percentage points ahead of last year but equal to the five-year
average. Reports of leaf blast and sheaf blight were confirmed in Arkansas,
and producers were applying mid-season and pre-flood nitrogen and herbicide
to the crop. Overall, 69 percent of the rice crop was reported in good to
excellent condition on June 29, equal to the condition rating on June 1 but
3 percentage points above the same time last year.

Producers had planted 78 percent of the Nation’s soybean crop by June 1. This
was 23 percentage points ahead of last year and 8 percentage points ahead of
the five-year average. Nationwide, 50 percent of the soybean crop had emerged
by June 1, twenty-one percentage points ahead of last year and 5 percentage
points ahead of the five-year average. Nationally, 94 percent of the soybean
crop had emerged by June 29, four percentage points ahead of last year but
equal to the five-year average. Ten percent of the Nation’s soybean crop was
at or beyond the blooming stage by June 29, seven percentage points ahead of
last year but equal to the five-year average. Overall, 72 percent of the
soybean crop was reported in good to excellent condition by month’s end,
2 percentage points lower than the June 8 rating but 5 percentage points
better than the same time last year.

Producers were steadily planting peanuts when June began, with 84 percent of
the crop in the ground by June 1, two percentage points ahead of both last
year and the five-year average. Peanut planting was nearly finished in South
Carolina as June began with 97 percent planted, 12 percentage points ahead of
the five-year average. Peanut producers had planted 96 percent of this year’s
crop by June 15. Peg development was evident in all major peanut producing
States except Virginia by June 15. Twenty-seven percent of the peanut crop
was pegging by June 29, eight percentage points ahead of last year and
3 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Overall, 72 percent of
the peanut crop was reported in good to excellent condition on June 29,
compared with 71 percent on June 15 and 72 percent at the same time last
year. Peanut conditions deteriorated at the end of the month in Alabama due
to increased rainfall and lack of sunshine.

Significant delays in sunflower planting were evident at the beginning of the
month in Colorado and North Dakota. Twenty-six percent of the sunflower crop
was planted by June 1, twelve percentage points ahead of last year but
7 percentage points behind the five-year average. Favorable planting
conditions in North Dakota allowed for 50 percent of the State’s sunflower
crop to be planted in the first two weeks of the month. South Dakota began
the month near the five-year average for planting progress, but wet
conditions slowed planting acceleration, and by the end of the month South
Dakota was 8 percentage points behind the five-year average. By June 29,
ninety-one percent of this year’s sunflower crop was planted, 3 percentage
points ahead of last year but 2 percentage points behind the five-year
average.

By June 1, seventy-four percent of the cotton crop was planted, 5 percentage
points behind last year and 7 percentage points behind the five-year average.
The cotton crop showed the first signs of squaring at the beginning of the
month with 5 percent squaring Nationwide, slightly ahead of last year but
slightly behind the five-year average. Ninety-five percent of this year’s
cotton crop was planted by June 15, with planting complete in Arizona,
Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, and Virginia at
that time. Three percent of the cotton crop was at or beyond the boll setting
stage by June 22, three percentage points behind the five-year average.
Thirty-six percent of this year’s cotton crop was at or beyond the squaring
stage by June 29, slightly ahead of last year but 6 percentage points behind
the five-year average. Nationwide, 7 percent of the cotton crop was setting
bolls by June 29, slightly ahead of last year but 3 percentage points behind
the five-year average. Overall, 53 percent of the cotton crop was reported in
good to excellent condition on June 29, compared with 50 percent on June 8
and 47 percent at the same time last year.

Crop Comments

Oats: Production is forecast at 75.5 million bushels, up 15 percent from
2013. If realized, this will be the fourth lowest production on record.
Growers expect to harvest 1.15 million acres for grain or seed, unchanged
from the Acreage report released on June 30, 2014 but up 12 percent from last
year. Based on conditions as of July 1, the average yield for the United
States is forecast at 65.5 bushels per acre, up 1.5 bushels from 2013. Oat
production in California is at a 133 year low.

The 2014 oat crop has developed at a normal pace in most of the nine major
producing States due to good growing conditions. As of June 29,
sixty-nine percent of the oat acreage was headed, 5 percentage points ahead
of last year’s pace but 4 percentage points behind the 5-year average. As of
June 29, sixty-four percent of the oat crop was rated in good to excellent
condition compared with 59 percent at the same time last year.

Barley: Production for the 2014 barley crop is forecast at 187 million
bushels, down 13 percent from 2013. Based on conditions as of July 1, the
average yield for the United States is forecast at 71.2 bushels per acre,
down 0.5 bushel from last year. Area harvested for grain or seed, at
2.63 million acres, is unchanged from the previous forecast but down
12 percent from 2013.

When compared with last year, yields are expected to decrease throughout much
of the United States due to drought conditions in the Pacific Northwest and
wet conditions in the Midwest and Northeast. Conversely, adequate moisture in
the northern and central Rocky Mountains have lead to expected yield
increases in Montana, Utah, and Wyoming.

Planting progress ran well ahead of the five-year average pace in the Pacific
Northwest, while producers in Minnesota and North Dakota battled lingering
unfavorable field conditions throughout the spring. Seeding was virtually
complete in Idaho and Washington by May 25. Producers had sown 93 percent of
the Nation’s crop by June 1, eleven percentage points ahead of last year and
4 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Heading progress remained
ahead of normal for the month of June, with 31 percent of the crop headed by
June 29, five percentage points ahead of last year and 6 percentage points
ahead of the five-year average. However, due to continued wet conditions and
residual effects from late spring planting, heading progress remained over a
week behind in Minnesota. Overall, 68 percent of the barley crop was reported
in good to excellent condition on June 29, slightly above the rating on
June 1 but equal to the same time last year.

Winter wheat: Production is forecast at 1.37 billion bushels, down 1 percent
from the June 1 forecast and down 11 percent from 2013. Based on July 1
conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 42.2 bushels per acre,
down 0.2 bushel from last month and down 5.2 bushels from last year. The area
expected to be harvested for grain or seed totals 32.4 million acres,
unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30, 2014 but up slightly
from last year. As of June 29, thirty percent of the winter wheat crop was
rated in good to excellent condition, compared with 34 percent at the same
time last year.

As of June 29, harvest progress was behind normal in all Hard Red Winter
(HRW) States except California. Yield increases from last month in the HRW
growing area are expected in Colorado, North Dakota, and South Dakota but
down in Kansas and Oklahoma.

As of June 29, harvest progress in the Soft Red Winter (SRW) growing area was
behind normal in all major producing States. Growers in Arkansas and Illinois
are expecting record high yields. Yield decreases from last month are
expected in the Southeast. Yield forecasts in Oregon and Washington are down
from the previous month’s forecasts.

Durum wheat: Production is forecast at 59.6 million bushels, down 4 percent
from 2013. The United States yield is forecast at 42.1 bushels per acre, down
1.5 bushels from last year. Expected area to be harvested for grain totals
1.42 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on
June 30, 2014 but down slightly from last year.

Durum wheat crop development has progressed behind normal in Montana and
North Dakota this year, the two largest Durum-producing States. As of
June 29, crop conditions in Montana and North Dakota were rated 70 percent
and 86 percent good to excellent, respectively. Yield forecasts are down from
last year in Montana and North Dakota

Other spring wheat: Production is forecast at 565 million bushels, up
6 percent from last year. Area harvested for grain is expected to total
12.4 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30,
2014 but up 9 percent from last year. The United States yield is forecast at
45.5 bushels per acre, down 1.6 bushels from 2013.

Crop development has been behind normal this spring primarily due to
excessive moisture in Minnesota and North Dakota. In the six major producing
States, 26 percent of the crop was at or beyond the heading stage as of June
29, ten percentage points ahead of last year but 3 percentage points behind
the 5-year average.

Compared with last year, yield decreases are expected in all other spring
wheat States except for Oregon. As of June 29, seventy percent of the other
spring wheat crop was rated as good to excellent condition compared with
68 percent at the same time last year.

Tobacco: United States all flue-cured tobacco production is forecast at
536 million pounds, up 18 percent from the 2013 crop. Area harvested, at
232,000 acres, is 1 percent above last year. Yield per acre for flue-cured
tobacco is forecast at 2,312 pounds, up 326 pounds from a year ago. If
realized, the Georgia flue-cured tobacco yield will be a record high.

Apricots: The 2014 apricot crop is forecast at 61,490 tons. The California
crop represents 89 percent of the total United States production. Harvest in
California began early due to warm spring and summer temperatures. Fruit set
was reported to be variable with excellent quality.

Grapefruit: The 2013-2014 United States grapefruit crop is forecast at
1.05 million tons, down 1 percent from the previous forecast and down
13 percent from last season’s final utilization.

Tangerines and mandarins: The United States tangerine and mandarin crop is
forecast at 668,000 tons, down 1 percent from the June forecast and down
2 percent from last season’s final utilization.

Lemons: The forecast for the 2013-2014 United States lemon crop is
871,000 tons, unchanged from the previous forecast but down 4 percent from
last season’s final utilization. In California, the crop is nearly 80 percent
harvested.

Tangelos: Florida’s tangelo forecast is 880,000 boxes (40,000 tons),
unchanged from the June forecast but down 11 percent from last season’s final
utilization. Tangelo harvest is complete for the season.

Florida citrus: High temperatures for the month ranged from the low to mid
90s. Widespread rainfall during June eliminated all drought conditions in
Florida. Next season’s crop is progressing well. Growers and caretakers
applied summer oil, fertilizing, irrigating, and in some cases reset new
trees. The 2013-2014 season has ended.

California citrus: Valencia orange harvest remained active. Ruby Red
grapefruit was harvested. Growers monitored for citrus greening disease. Some
citrus groves were pulled out due to lack of water.

California noncitrus fruits and nuts: Orchards and vineyards were sprayed and
irrigated. Grape growers continued to thin and tip bunches, thin leaves, and
train vines to allow sunlight and airflow. Grape growers monitored mildew and
vine mealybug. Grape berries began to color in the Central Valley. Table
grape harvest was ongoing in the Coachella Valley. Apples increased in size;
growers sprayed for coddling moths. Asian pear fruit increased in size and
began to color. Fig harvest was ongoing in Merced County. Early clingstone
peach harvest began. Apricot, nectarine, Freestone peach, and plum harvests
continued with many mid-season varieties. Reflective foil remained in stone
fruit orchards to enhance fruit color. Prune fruit continued to develop.
Cherry harvest was near completion. Olive and pomegranate fruit increased in
size. Fuyu persimmons were thinned. Strawberry and blueberry harvests were
slowing. Almond growers applied hull split sprays; hull split was expected to
begin next month. Walnut growers set out husk fly traps and monitored for
coddling moths. Pistachio nuts continued to develop as growers sprayed for
weeds, navel orangeworm, and alternaria.

Statistical Methodology

Wheat survey procedures: Objective yield and farm operator surveys were
conducted between June 24 and July 7 to gather information on expected yield
as of July 1. The objective yield survey was conducted in 10 States that
accounted for 60 percent of the 2013 winter wheat production. Farm operators
were interviewed to update previously reported acreage data and seek
permission to randomly locate two sample plots in selected winter wheat
fields. The counts made within each sample plot depended upon the crop’s
maturity. Counts such as number of stalks, heads in late boot, and number of
emerged heads were made to predict the number of heads that would be
harvested. The counts are used with similar data from previous years to
develop a projected biological yield. The average harvesting loss is
subtracted to obtain a net yield. The plots are revisited each month until
crop maturity when the heads are clipped, threshed, and weighed. After the
farm operator has harvested the sample field, another plot is sampled to
obtain current year harvesting loss.

The farm operator survey was conducted primarily by telephone with some use
of mail, internet, and personal interviewers. Approximately 8,100 producers
were interviewed during the survey period and asked questions about the
probable yield on their operation. These growers will continue to be surveyed
throughout the growing season to provide indications of average yields.

Orange survey procedures: The orange objective yield survey for the July 1
forecast was conducted in Florida, which accounts for 65 percent of the
United States production. Bearing tree numbers are determined at the start of
the season based on a fruit tree census conducted every other year, combined
with ongoing review based on administrative data or special surveys. From
mid-July to mid-September, the number of fruit per tree is determined. In
September and subsequent months, fruit size measurement and fruit droppage
surveys are conducted, which combined with the previous components, are used
to develop the current forecast of production. California and Texas conduct
grower and packer surveys on a quarterly basis in October, January, April,
and July. California also conducts objective measurement surveys in September
for Navel oranges and in March for Valencia oranges.

Wheat estimating procedures: National and State level objective yield and
grower reported data were reviewed for reasonableness and consistency with
historical estimates. The survey data were also reviewed considering weather
patterns and crop progress compared to previous months and previous years.
Each Regional Field Office submits their analysis of the current situation to
the Agricultural Statistics Board (ASB). The ASB uses the survey data and the
State analyses to prepare the published July 1 forecasts.

Orange estimating procedures: State level objective yield estimates for
Florida oranges were reviewed for errors, reasonableness, and consistency
with historical estimates. Reports from growers and packers in California and
Texas were also used for setting estimates. These three States submit their
analyses of the current situation to the Agricultural Statistics Board (ASB).
The ASB uses the survey data and the State analyses to prepare the published
July 1 forecast.

Revision policy: The July 1 production forecast will not be revised; instead,
a new forecast will be made each month throughout the growing season.
End-of-season wheat estimates are made after harvest. At the end of the wheat
marketing season, a balance sheet is calculated using carryover stocks,
production, exports, millings, feeding, and ending stocks. Revisions are then
made if the balance sheet relationships or other administrative data warrant
changes. End-of-season orange estimates will be published in September’s
Citrus Fruits Summary. The orange production estimates are based on all data
available at the end of the marketing season, including information from
marketing orders, shipments, and processor records. Allowances are made for
recorded local utilization and home use.

Reliability: To assist users in evaluating the reliability of the July 1
production forecast, the “Root Mean Square Error,” a statistical measure
based on past performance, is computed. The deviation between the July 1
production forecast and the final estimate is expressed as a percentage of
the final estimate. The average of the squared percentage deviations for the
latest 20-year period is computed. The square root of the average becomes
statistically the “Root Mean Square Error.” Probability statements can be
made concerning expected differences in the current forecast relative to the
final end-of-season estimate, assuming that factors affecting this year’s
forecast are not different from those influencing recent years.

The “Root Mean Square Error” for the July 1 winter wheat production forecast
is 1.8 percent. This means that chances are 2 out of 3 that the current
winter wheat production will not be above or below the final estimate by more
than 1.8 percent. Chances are 9 out of 10 (90 percent confidence level) that
the difference will not exceed 3.1 percent. Differences between the July 1
winter wheat production forecast and the final estimate during the past
20 years have averaged 21 million bushels, ranging from less than 1 million
to 65 million bushels. The July 1 forecast has been below the final estimate
9 times and above 11 times. This does not imply that the July 1 winter wheat
forecast this year is likely to understate or overstate final production.

The “Root Mean Square Error” for the July 1 orange production forecast is
1.5 percent. However, if you exclude the three abnormal production seasons
(one freeze and two hurricane seasons), the “Root Mean Square Error” is
1.4 percent. This means that chances are 2 out of 3 that the current orange
production forecast will not be above or below the final estimates by more
than 1.5 percent, or 1.4 percent, excluding abnormal seasons. Chances are
9 out of 10 (90 percent confidence level) that the difference will not exceed
2.6 percent, or 2.4 percent, excluding abnormal seasons.

Changes between the July 1 orange forecast and the final estimates during the
past 20 years have averaged 123,000 tons (116,000 tons, excluding abnormal
seasons), ranging from 9,000 tons to 370,000 tons regardless of exclusions.
The July 1 forecast for oranges has been below the final estimate 8 times and
above 12 times (below 5 times and above 12 times, excluding abnormal
seasons). The difference does not imply that the July 1 forecast this year is
likely to understate or overstate final production.

Information Contacts

Listed below are the commodity statisticians in the Crops Branch of the National Agricultural Statistics
Service to contact for additional information. E-mail inquiries may be sent to nass@nass.usda.gov

Lance Honig, Chief, Crops Branch……………………………………………… (202) 720-2127

Anthony Prillaman, Head, Field Crops Section…………………………………… (202) 720-2127
Cody Brokmeyer – Peanuts, Rice…………………………………………… (202) 720-7688
Brent Chittenden – Oats, Rye, Wheat………………………………………. (202) 720-8068
Angie Considine – Cotton, Cotton Ginnings, Sorghum…………………………. (202) 720-5944
Tony Dahlman – Crop Weather, Barley………………………………………. (202) 720-7621
Chris Hawthorn – Corn, Flaxseed, Proso Millet……………………………… (202) 720-9526
James Johanson – County Estimates, Hay……………………………………. (202) 690-8533
Travis Thorson – Soybeans, Sunflower, Other Oilseeds……………………….. (202) 720-7369

Jorge Garcia-Pratts, Head, Fruits, Vegetables and Special Crops Section…………… (202) 720-2127
Vincent Davis – Fresh and Processing Vegetables, Onions, Strawberries, Cherries.. (202) 720-2157
Fred Granja – Apples, Apricots, Plums, Prunes, Tobacco …………………….. (202) 720-9085
LaKeya Jones – Citrus, Coffee, Grapes, Sugar Crops, Tropical Fruits………….. (202) 720-5412
Greg Lemmons – Berries, Cranberries, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes ………………. (202) 720-4285
Dave Losh – Hops……………………………………………………….. (360) 709-2400
Dan Norris – Austrian Winter Peas, Dry Edible Peas, Lentils, Mint,
Mushrooms, Peaches, Pears, Wrinkled Seed Peas, Dry Beans ………………. (202) 720-3250
Daphne Schauber – Floriculture, Maple Syrup, Nursery, Tree Nuts …………….. (202) 720-4215

Access to NASS Reports

For your convenience, you may access NASS reports and products the following
ways:

All reports are available electronically, at no cost, on the NASS web
site: http://www.nass.usda.gov

Both national and state specific reports are available via a free e-
mail subscription. To set-up this free subscription, visit
http://www.nass.usda.gov and in the “Follow NASS” box under “Receive
reports by Email,” click on “National” or “State” to select the reports
you would like to receive.

For more information on NASS surveys and reports, call the NASS Agricultural
Statistics Hotline at (800) 727-9540, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, or e-mail:
nass@nass.usda.gov.

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