02-03-14 Lowderman, Weishaar and Robinson inducted into Livestock Marketeers Hall of Fame…

Lynn Weishaar (left) of Reva, SD, and Jack Lowderman (right) of Macomb, IL, were inducted into the Livestock Marketeers Hall of Fame at the National Western Club in Denver on Jan. 18. Neil Orth (center) of Kansas City, MO, was master of ceremonies for the event.

Lynn Weishaar (left) of Reva, SD, and Jack Lowderman (right) of Macomb, IL, were inducted into the Livestock Marketeers Hall of Fame at the National Western Club in Denver on Jan. 18. Neil Orth (center) of Kansas City, MO, was master of ceremonies for the event.

DENVER — The Livestock Marketeers inducted three industry professionals into their Hall of Fame during the National Western Stock Show.

 The Livestock Marketeers — an informal fraternity of livestock fieldmen, auctioneers, sale managers and related livestock business leaders — met for their 49th Annual Banquet at the National Western Club on Jan. 18. The event is hosted by American Live Stock.
 The 2014 honorees included Jack Lowderman of Macomb, IL, and Lynn Weishaar of Reva, SD. Terry Robinson of Bismarck, ND, was honored posthumously.
 Master of ceremonies was J. Neil Orth, executive vice president of the American-International Charolais Association and a 1984 Hall of Fame inductee. He opened the banquet with recordings of both Lowderman and Weishaar from the 1977 World Livestock Auctioneer Championship competition.
 The Livestock Marketeers group was initiated in 1965 by Harry Green, Ross Miller and Claud Willett. Their purpose was to form a fraternal organization of livestock professionals, and to make annual awards in order to encourage younger members of the industry to succeed in their chosen profession.
Jack Lowderman
 Jack’s involvement with the livestock industry has been life-long. He worked side-by-side with his father, buying and selling commercial cows and bulls in his youth. Following high school, he graduated from Reisch College of Auctioneering and became owner/operator and auctioneer of a livestock market for six years.
 In 1968, he formed an auction partnership with Tommy Williams, a purebred Angus breeder; they actively continued for 17 years, conducting livestock, real estate, personal property and farm machinery auctions.
 In 1976, Jack began a 30-year run as the lead auctioneer at F&T Commission Company in Palmyra, MO. He also auctioned commercial livestock at four community weekly markets, purebred cattle for breeders and associations, and numerous production tested bull sales in Missouri and Illinois. He’s competed in the World Livestock Auctioneer Championships and has been named a champion or finalist in six of the annual contests.
 Jack is the founder of Lowderman Auction Company, a family owned and operated marketing business that has grown to include his three sons. Today, the company conducts over 100 auctions yearly throughout the Midwest, marketing agricultural, residential and commercial real estate; personal property, including machinery and equipment, antiques and collectibles; specialty items; vehicles; and estates.
 Their 20-acre auction facility at Macomb, IL, features 20,000 square feet under one roof. One indoor sales pavilion hosts a monthly consignment auction with three rings of merchandise offered at any one time. A second building with a livestock sales arena is available for purebred cattle auctions of all breeds.
 As an auctioneer for Williams & Williams, a Tulsa, OK-based company that markets residential and commercial real estate, Jack travels nationwide. He is a graduate of the Certified Appraisal Institute, compiling both real and personal property evaluations.
 Jack and his wife, Sherry, began their commitment to the Hereford breed when they were given two Polled Hereford cows as a wedding gift from her Dad. As the family grew to include four sons, the cattle numbers expanded as well.
 Today, the Lowderman Cattle Company is truly a family operation with sons, daughters-in-law, and grandchildren: Monte, Carrie and Rhett; Brent, Kris, Blake and Morgan; Cody and Abby; and son, Cory, always in their hearts.
 The herd has grown to include 200 mother cows, 30 recips, and the 2013 National Western Stock Show Champion Hereford Bull. They hold an annual sale on the third Sundayof September. The family was honored in 2013 with the Seedstock Producer of the Year award from the Illinois Beef Association, as well as Breeder of the Year honors from the Illinois Hereford Association.
 Jack served as a 4-H leader for 10 years, president and board member of the Illinois Polled Hereford Association, and a member of the Illinois Beef Council and Illinois Beef Association.
 Tommy Williams of Tulsa, OK, and Delvin Heldermon of Sulphur, OK, roasted Jack at the Livestock Marketeers banquet.
Lynn Weishaar
 “I hung around auction barns every chance I got,” Lynn Weishaar recalls. He started pretending to sort and sell baby calves on his family’s ranch near Lemmon, SD, when he was four or five years old.
 So began a passion for the lifestyle that has lasted his whole life.
 While in high school, Lynn began working for Robert Schnell, who ran the sale barn in Lemmon. He credits Schnell for getting him started in livestock marketing. He attended the Western College of Auctioneering in Billings, MT, and later graduated from North Dakota State University, where he was active in college rodeo and on the judging teams.
 After college, he returned to the Lemmon area, leased a ranch, and began selling at that sale barn; it was his first real job selling livestock. Lynn soon took on the barns at Faith and Philip, sold at Sturgis until it closed down, and now sells at Philip and Belle Fourche on a weekly basis.
 Lynn also sells registered horse and cattle sales across the country — from Canada to Texas and from Iowa to the West Coast — traveling to up to 300 sales a year and thousands of miles.
 In the 1970’s, Lynn started a consignment horse sale for proven ranch and arena horses that has caught on nationwide. This type of sale has opened up a reliable source for marketing good horses, and for the buyer to find a dependable product. It has given him the opportunity to sell some of the greatest horses in the country, and has been a big influence on the horse industry in the central United States.
 Lynn says selling livestock at auction is challenging, especially with fluctuating markets and political developments on the national level. But he still likes his job. He loves the excitement and the fast pace.
 Best of all, he said, “I deal with the best people and the best stock in the world on a daily basis.”
 Weishaar’s clients say, “nobody works harder at his business,” “a total pro,” and “the cattle and horse industry in western South Dakota wouldn’t be all that it is today if not for him.”
 Lynn is also living the other part of his dream, running a commercial cattle ranch with his wife, Connie. Riding his horse and checking his cattle are highlights of his day and are his greatest getaway.
 Lynn and Connie have two children, Seth and Jodi. Seth is also an auctioneer, and Jodi does contract work in the western industry along with raising a family. Best of all are the five grandchildren: Seth and Nicole have three, and Jodi and Rob have two.
 “I’ve been very lucky,” Lynn says, “The two things I wanted to do, I got to do . . . and I’m very happy about that.”
 He was roasted at the Livestock Marketeers event by friends Kirby Goettsch of Aberdeen, SD, and Jay George of Lebo, KS, as well as his brother, Wayne Weishaar.
Terry Robinson
 Jeff Thomas remembers Terry Robinson as “always a general, and a great mentor.”
 Terry graduated from North Dakota State University with a degree in psychology, and served in the United States military and the North Dakota Army National Guard for over 33 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of colonel. In 2009 and 2011, he was appointed the rank of brigadier general by the governor of North Dakota to act as a “State Flood Recovery Coordinator.” His military career was one of the highlights of his life.
 In the fall of 1970, Terry went to work for the ND REC Magazine as advertising manager. In 1981, he acquired part ownership of the Farm and Ranch Guide. Terry was instrumental in creating a much-loved rural paper that had a huge focus in the cattle industry, and felt very close to his accounts. Terry was an excellent judge of cattle, and a familiar face at livestock events throughout his territory. He always said he was a very lucky man to be involved with such a wonderful rural family.
 He married Joyce, his high school sweetheart, in 1969 and raised two children, Cade (April) and Kree (Troy) Nelson; they have eight grandchildren.
 Terry Robinson died May 13, 2013, due to an accident. He was posthumously inducted into the Livestock Marketeers Hall of Fame by friends Jeff Thomas of Bozeman, MT, and Vern Frey of Towner, ND.